Memorials 1

ABBOTT, Mary Ellen (Minnie)

Mary Abbott, often known as Minnie, was born on 14th April 1863, at Ballarat, Victoria. She was the eldest child of William Henry Abbott and Mary Elizabeth Searle. William was born on 23rd June 1839 at Anaghadoo, County Monaghan, Ireland, and Mary was born on 27th November 1844 at Torquay, in Devon. William and Mary came to Australia as early settlers and married at Ballarat.

William was a baker, of Ballarat, and family legend has it that the famous “Welcome” nugget of gold was brought into his bakery to be weighed. One of the finders is reputed to have said to William’s wife Mary, “If you can lift it, lady, you can have it.” Unfortunately, that was quite beyond Mary’s ability.

Besides Mary Ellen, six other children were born to William and Mary at Ballarat. One of these was Ada Jane,’ who after the family had been in Tasmania for some time, married Carl Eberhard, chemist, of Launceston, who built and lived in 122 Elphin Road.

William and Mary and their family moved to Melbourne, where two more children were born.

The family came to Tasmania in 1880 and settled in Launceston where William became a brewer at the Cornwall Brewery. This establishment was owned by the Fawns family and headed by the Revd J. A. Fawns. William Abbott eventually became a partner. When Mr Fawns died in 1887, William Abbott set up his own Phoenix Brewery and operated as a brewer, soft drink maker, sauce maker, tea and coffee merchant.

The soft drink factory was in Paterson Street from 1879, next door to The Examiner newspaper building, but was demolished not many years ago to make way for a car park. This business was run under the name of M. E.  Abbott, (Mary Elizabeth), and eventually became “Abbott’s Pty. Ltd.”. Mary Ellen kept the books for this concern until her death on 28th February 1901.

Mary Ellen was a keen stamp collector and corresponded with many other collectors all over Australia and New Zealand. She was a member of St. John’s choir, and she and most of her brothers and sisters were confirmed there.

It is interesting to note that three of Mary Ellen’s uncles became Anglican clergymen, one of them as archdeacon. The Revd Joseph Abbott was connected with the Sidmouth parish.

After the death of Mary Ellen, the family had a brass plaque erected in St. John’s Church. It was first placed on the back of one of the old cedar choir stalls, but when the present stalls were introduced the plaque was repositioned by the choir vestry door. The inscription reads:

IN REMEMBRANCE OF
M. E. (MINNIE) ABBOTT
DIED FEBRUARY 28 1901
A MEMBER OF ST. JOHN’S CHURCH CHOIR
FOR 15 YEARS
PEACE, PERFECT PEACE
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

AHERIN, Rosetta May

Rosetta was born in Ireland in the 1860s, the daughter of Henry Warren of Drumin House, Co. Meath. Rosetta came to Australia as a young girl with her parents who settled in Sandringham, Victoria.

She married Charles Richard Aherin of Victoria and they had one daughter. The family later took up residence in Launceston and joined the congregation of St. John’s Church. Rosetta became actively involved in the community and social work and was a member of the Elphin Road/Newstead branch of the Launceston General Hospital Auxiliary.

In February 1935, Rosetta suffered a bad accident in Sandringham where she was visiting. The accident resulted in a broken hip and other injuries from which she did not recover. She died on 3rd May 1935. In St. John’s Church, in her memory, a brass plaque was erected in the north aisle. Charles Aherin moved to Devonport and died there in 1957, aged 93. The inscription on the plaque for Rosetta reads:

IN LOVING MEMORY OF
ROSETTA MAY AHERIN
DAUGHTER OF HENRY WARREN
DRUMIN HOUSE CO. MEATH, IRELAND
BELOVED MOTHER OF WYVERNE MURRAY WHITE
3RD MAY 1935
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

ALCOCK, Ida Victoria

Ida Alcock was born on 17th June 1887 the daughter of Andrew John and Margaret Martha Bramich, formerly Johnstone, of Black Forest in the Deloraine district. She was educated in Deloraine, and the family were members of St. Mark’s Anglican Church there. On 17th April 1917 she married John Reginald Alcock, at St. Mark’sChurch. John Alcock was born in Bredbury, near Stockport, England.

The Alcock family was active members of St. Mark’s until John died late in the 1930s. Ida then moved to Launceston with her family, where they became members of St. John’s in 1940. Ida was a member of St. John’s Mothers’ Union, the CWA, Victoria League and the League of Remembrance. She also took a great interest in the Red Cross. Ida Victoria died in Launceston on 8th August 1980 aged 91.

Of her six children, the eldest three served in the forces during World War II, John and Graham with the R.A.A.F. and Kathlene with the W.A.A.F. John was killed in 1942. The younger members of the family were confirmed in St. John’s. Kathlene, the eldest daughter, lived in Launceston except for three years during the war and seven years spent in England after the war. Nancy, Ida’s younger daughter, has worked most of her life overseas as a biochemist and at the time of the completion of a memorial banner given in Ida’s memory, held the position of assistant professor of biochemistry at the Memorial Hospital, New York. A donation from the staff of this department contributed towards the cost of the banner.

The banner was worked by St. John’s members of the Embroiderers’ Guild of Tasmania. The banner bears the Mothers’ Union emblem and a modern picture of The Madonna and Child. The inscription is on a small brass plate on the banner stand; it reads:

IN MEMORY OF
IDA VICTORIA ALCOCK
17TH JUNE 1887
8TH AUGUST 1980
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

ARMITAGE, David

The Armitage family came from Huddlesford, Yorkshire, England in the early 1860s. In Yorkshire the family had been in the furniture trade as skilled cabinet makers.

David, born in 1869 in Launceston, was one of six children of David Armitage, late of Huddlesford. After his education he was apprenticed to Mr Storrer, undertaker of Launceston, whose rooms and workshop were at the corner of St. John and York Streets. Another apprentice was Charles T. Finney. After several years Storrer gave his undertaking business to Armitage and Finney, and continued as a cabinet maker for some time. Armitage handled all the Roman Catholic funerals and Finney looked after funerals for those of other religions.

David married Georgina Calver. She was born in Northern Ireland and she and two of her brothers came to Tasmania and settled in Launceston. One was Clarence Calver- a noted dentist in town for many years. David and Georgina had four children.

On 1st December 1921 David died quite suddenly while on duty at a funeral at Frankford. After this his son, David, who had been an apprentice, set up his own business at 116 St. John Street. Charles Finney also opened his own establishment in Brisbane Street.

The members of the Anglican community were moved by David’s sincerity and care and erected a plaque to the memory of his passing. The plaque is in St. John’s Church in the south aisle. The inscription reads:

ERECTED IN AFFECTIONATE MEMORY OF
DAVID ARMITAGE
WHO DIED SUDDENLY 1ST DECEMBER 1921
HIS SYMPATHY AND KINDNESS
TO MANY IN THEIR TIME OF BEREAVEMENT
WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

ARTHUR, George

George Arthur was born on 21st June 1784, fourth son of John Arthur of Plymouth, Devon, England, and Catherine his wife, daughter of Thomas Cornish of Portsmouth. Hampshire, England. They married 3rd March 1767. The family was originally from Cornwall, and moved to Devon early in the eighteenth century.

Arthur joined the army in 1804 as ensign in the 91st Regiment. He rose steadily through the ranks and is said to have seen service in the Napoleonic Wars.

In May 1814, he married Eliza Ord Ussher, second daughter of Lieutenant General Sir John Frederick Sigismund Smith K.C.B. They had several children, George, Frederick, Charles, Edward born 1825, Sigismund 1828, John 1830, and Leonard 1832. These last four were born in Van Diemen’s Land. The daughters were Isabella, Catherine, Eliza, Frances and Georgina.

George Arthur became a colonel of the York Chasseurs, and was appointed Superintendent of Honduras in 1814. In 1822, he was commissioned Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen’s Land. He arrived on 12th May 1824 on board the ‘Adrian’.

The colonists knew him as a man of medium size, tubby, but erect and brisk. For special occasions, he wore a scarlet uniform, but usually his usual attire was a black frock coat, black trousers with a red seam down the outside leg, black belt with sword in gleaming sheath, and black beaver hat. He had dark red hair, receding, with mutton-chop whiskers.

George Arthur was in Van Diemen’s Land for twelve years, and in that time the colony progressed greatly, especially in the North. Arthur re-organised the administration of the North and appointed a civil commandant in Launceston to replace the military officers who had been in charge from the earliest days of settlement. He also appointed civil officials in charge of the gaols in George Town and Launceston.

One of his early duties in his first year of office was to lay the foundation stone of St. John’s Church, Launceston, on 28th December 1824. Also at that time he subscribed to a fund, opened by the Reverend John Youl to purchase an organ for the church.

In his years in the colony, George Arthur supported many benevolent interests, including the Temperance Society, Bible Society, the Wesleyan Missions, schools, Orphans’ Societies, Missions to Seamen, the Benevolent Society and the Mechanics’ Institutes.

Governor Arthur’s standards of governing were tough but fair, although very hard on the convicts, and a certain amount of unrest developed among the free settlers.

Colonel Arthur returned to England in 1836. There he was created a Knight of Hanover in December, and was then appointed Governor of Upper Canada. His term of office lasted for five years, and in December 1841, he returned to England. There he was created a baronet.

From 1842 to 1846, Sir George Arthur was Governor of Bombay, and in 1847 he was appointed to the Privy Council. The following year, Sir George was made an Honorary Doctor of Civil Law at Oxford University. In 1853, he became a colonel of the Queen’s Own Regiment and was gazetted lieutenant General in 1854. He died on 19th September 1854.

In Launceston in 1910, Mr Walter Perrin and the Reverend J. S. Bryers of St. John’s gave four stained-glass windows for the choir vestry of that church. Each displays the heraldic arms of persons whose lives have touched St. John’s. Sir George Arthur was the original Grantee of these arms. The blazon reads:

Arms:

Or, on a chev, Az., between two clarions in chief, Gu., and a kangaroo Serg., in base Ppr., and two swords the points upwards also Ppr., points and hilts of the first, on a chief of the third a horse courant, Ar.

Crest:

In front of two swords in saltier Ppr., pommels and hilts Or., a pelican in her piety Sa., the nest gold.

Motto:

‘Stet Fortuna Domus.’  (‘let the fortune of the house stand’)

(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BABINGTON, George Morgan

George Babington was born at Killibegs, in Donegal Ireland in 1817. He was educated there and became a qualified surveyor. He arrived in Van Diemen’s Land on the barque ‘Helen’ in 1835. He lived and worked in Hobart for a number of years and was responsible for the survey and construction of several roads. For a few years George Babington moved to New Zealand and was involved in the whaling trade. He also surveyed and laid out several early small towns there.

After a short visit to the gold fields in California he returned to Tasmania and settled in Launceston where he was appointed town surveyor to the Launceston Municipal Council in September 1853. He held this position for twenty-nine years. At the time of his appointment there was no proper sewerage system and no gas or water supplies. However George Babington developed and supervised the construction of a water delivery scheme proposed by a Mr Lamont, to bring water from St Patrick’s River to Launceston. Babington also mapped out the permanent levels of the town streets and supervised all the works on the town sewers, except for Margaret Street.

With the Building Act of 1863, the duties of superintendent of waterworks were combined with those of town surveyor. George Babington filled both these roles until his retirement at the end of 1882.

In private life he was a member on the Church of England and attended St John’s Church. For twenty-one years he was superintendent of St John’s Sunday School and for ten years was a churchwarden.

He was a member of the Launceston Benevolent Society for twenty years and served as Treasurer and Executive Committee member. He was also a director of several mining companies.

George Babington married and had a son and four daughters. They resided in Paterson Street. He died in Launceston on 29th December 1888 aged 71 years.

In the 1890s, the teachers and students of the Sunday School erected a ‘large marble plaque in the parish hall in memory of George Babington and Frederick Lakin. The plaque was placed on the inside wall that became become an outside wall within the hotel complex next door, but since 1990 stands in history room. The inscription reads:

ERECTED BY THE TEACHERS AND STUDENTS OF ST. JOHN’S SUNDAY SCHOOL AS A TOKEN OF LOVE AND ESTEEM TO THE MEMORY OF GEORGE BABINGTON,
WHO WAS SUPERINTENDENT FOR 21 YEARS.
DIED DECEMBER 29TH 1888
(FREDERICK LAKIN,
WHO WAS LIBRARIAN FOR 25 YEARS
DIED MARCH 9TH 1889)
THEY REST FROM THEIR LABOURS, AND THEIR WORKS DO FOLLOW THEM
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BALFOUR, Charlotte

Charlotte Balfour was the wife of Colonel William Balfour (1785-1838) of the 40th Regiment, who was civil and military commandant in Launceston in 1825 and 1826. They arrived in Sydney in January 1825 on the ‘Castle Forbes’ and sailed to Van Diemen’s Land with a special detachment for Port Dalrymple.

Charlotte unfortunately died on 22nd August 1825, aged 33, leaving several young children. This appears to have been one of the earliest burials in the settlement of person of note. Her body was laid to rest in a brick vault outside the east end of the Church. Twice after her burial the Church has been extended over her place of rest and she lies undisturbed beneath the floor of St. John’s Church. A marble tablet was erected nearby to mark the passing of this lady.

It was not until October 1938, when the floor of the church was lifted during alterations to the nave, that the brickwork of the vault was uncovered.

Charlotte died at the Government Cottage, situated in today’s City Park, near where the cannon stands. Balfour Street would have been named in honour of the Colonel.

The marble memorial tablet has had, in living memory, two situations. As far as is known it was hung on the south wall of the nave facing inwards, since 1938 it has been hung in the south ambulatory of St. John’s Church. The inscription on the tablet reads:

SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF CHARLOTTE,
THE WIFE OF LT. COL. BALFOUR OF THE 40TH REGT.,
WHO DIED AT GOVERNMENT HOUSE, LAUNCESTON
AUGUST 22ND 1825
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BARNES, William

William Barnes was born in Launceston in 1832, the son of William Barnes who arrived in Launceston in March 1824 and Anne Jane Sharland, school teacher, and daughter of W H Sharland of Hobart.

The elder William Barnes was the first brewer in the town, and set up the Port Dalrymple Brewery near the river on property bounded on two sides by Paterson and Margaret Streets. This William Barnes was given land in the Trevallyn Estate including the Cataract Gorge area.

The younger William lived all his life in Launceston, except for a few years spent in England finishing his education. During his life he was a member, for almost twenty years, of the Board of Management of the Launceston General Hospital. He took a keen and active interest in all public and philanthropic movements. For many years he presented the seat of Selby in the House of Assembly.

At Trevallyn, William Barnes carried on sheep farming for many years, with great success. He was a trustee of the Grammar School from 1877 to 1898. He was also a member of the District Nursing Association, and the Natural Science Association.

In 1861, at New Norfolk, he married Isabella Susan Sharland, daughter of William Sharland of ‘Woodbridge’, New Norfolk. They had two daughters.

William Barnes died in 1899. His wife, who survived him, made many generous gifts to St. John’s Church; the brass book-desk for the altar, the brass alms tray and in memory of her husband, a communion rail of hardwood supported by finely wrought brass standards. With her death a few years later, the Trevallyn property was bequeathed to the City Council, and has been developed as the Cliff Gardens at the Cataract Gorge. On the communion rail at St. John’s the inscription reads:

THIS RAIL IS ERECTEDTO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF
WILLIAM BARNES OF TREVALLYN
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BARRETT, William Rothwell and Ada Lilian

William Barrett was born in Sydney, New South Wales in 1893, the son of William Barrett, a carpenter, and Alice Matilda Rothwell. He was able to matriculate and graduated M.A. and Th.L. with First Class Honours from the University of Sydney in 1916. In the same year he was ordained deacon and appointed assistant curate of St. John’s Church, Launceston. In 1917 at St. David’s Cathedral, Hobart, he was ordained priest and on 2nd January 1918. he married Ada Genders at St. John’s Church.

Ada Barrett was born in Adelaide, South Australia, the daughter of Joseph Charles Genders and Albina Louisa Perry. Her parents moved to Launceston and were active members of St. John’s parish. At the time of her marriage Ada was an actively involved with the Church Missionary Society and a volunteer staff member.

Shortly after their marriage the Barretts moved. The Reverend William being appointed successively to the parishes of Penguin, Queenstown and Cressy. He became warden of St. Wilfrid’s College, Cressy in 1924 and, when it closed in 1929, he became the first warden of the new Christ College, Hobart. In 1931 he became a member of the Diocesan Council, in 1934 a member of the General Synod and in 1935 was appointed Canon Chancellor of St. David’s Cathedral.

In 1942 Canon Barrett was appointed Archdeacon of Hobart, he was already a member of the Board of St. John’s Hospital, a trustee of the Church Missionary Society and, since 1941, warden of the Senate of the University of Tasmania.

The 1950s was a period of growth in the Church, so much so that, in 1955, William Barrett was consecrated bishop and appointed Assistant Bishop of Tasmania, residing in Launceston. Bishop Barrett took up his new task with enthusiasm as did his wife, who was an equal partner in the work. The couple was childless, their only son having died in infancy. They were respected, by all and loved by many.

Ada Lilian Barrett died early in 1966 and Bishop Barrett died three months later, aged 73 years. Their ashes were placed within the wall of the sanctuary of St. John’s Church, with a plaque to mark the place. It is inscribed as follows:

IN MEMORY OF ADA LILIAN BARRETT
d. 10TH FEBRUARY 1966
WILLIAM ROTHWELL BARRETT BISHOP,
d. 3RD MAY 1966
WHOSE ASHES ARE DEPOSITED IN THIS SANCTUARY
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BARRON, Harry

Harry Barron was born on 11th August 1847 at Tunbridge Wells, East Sussex, England. He was educated there and at Woolwich. In 1867, aged 20, he entered the Royal Artillery as a lieutenant, was promoted to colonel by 1874 and Major-General in 1904. He became chief instructor of the School of Gunnery at Shoeburyness, near the mouth of the Thames. He eventually was given command of the Royal Artillery in the Thames district. He also held a similar command in Malta from 1904.

He was made a Knight Commander of St Michael and St George (K.C.M.G.) and a Commander of the Victorian Order (C.V.O.). On his retirement from active service in 1909 he was appointed Governor of Tasmania. This term of office lasted from 29th September, 1909 until 8th March 1913.

Sir Harry was then appointed to Western Australia as Governor for four years. In 1917 he returned to England and retired to Weybridge, Surrey. He died there on 27th March 1921.

In 1910 Walter Perrin and the Reverend J. S. Bryers, rector of St. John’s Church at the time, gave to the church four stained-glass windows for the choir vestry. Each displays the heraldic arms of people whose lives have touched St. John’s. The arms in the window for Sir Harry Barron were established in the Visitation of London 1633-1634, to a family of Barron, and it is possible Sir Harry Barron was descended from the original grantee.

As the arms are intended to represent Sir Harry, and as he did not establish for himself a pedigree or entitlement, it can only be said that at some time the Barron family, or Sir Harry himself, assumed these arms. The colours have not been interpreted correctly as the blue area should be red. The motto is mis-spelt and the author is not willing to attempt a translation. The blazon reads:

Arms:

Az. two lions passant quardant Ar.

Crest:

On a wreath out of clouds, pp, issuing rays Or holding a broken sword Ar. hilt and pommel Or.”

Motto:  sert fortnam domis

(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BECK, Alfred and Eliza Annie

Alfred was born in Worthing, West Sussex, England, in 1851. Little else is known of his youth except that he was apprenticed in the clothing trade in London and gained experience at the most up-to-date haberdashery houses in that city.

He emigrated to Victoria where he married Eliza Annie, formerly Watkins, daughter of J. Watkins of London. In 1876 they came to Tasmania. He was then employed subsequently, Smith, Poole & Lark, Herbert & Co., and L. Stevenson & Son in 1885. He remained with this last concern for several years after it was taken over by D. & W. Murray in Cameron Street.

Alfred and Eliza had four children and established their home in the first house built on Trevallyn when the estate was cut up in 1884. Alfred was intensely interested in horticulture and developed a beautiful flower garden. His blooms were seen among the winning exhibits at amateur floral shows for many years.

Eliza was a willing and consistent worker for several charities and, during the hardships of World War I and the depression that followed, was an active member of the Trevallyn branch of the Red Cross Society.

On 26th February 1903 Alfred died aged 51 years. Eliza was to survive him by thirty-eight years and died on 26th November 1941, at the age of 87.

Through all the years they had lived in Tasmania they had been members of the congregation of St. John’s Church and there in their memory a memorial plaque of opus sectile mosaic was erected in the baptistry. Above the inscription the armorial bearings of a Beck family have been placed. The inscription and the blazon read:

IN LOVING MEMORY OF
ALFRED AND ELIZA ANNIE BECK
ERECTED BY THEIR ELDEST SON
GEORGE MELBOURNE BECK

Arms:

Or, two bans dancettee Sa.

on a chief Az. three Annulets Ar.

Crest:

A peacock’s head erased Or. gorged with two bars dancettee Sa. between two Wings Az. each charged with three bezants paleways.

(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BECK, James

James was born in Launceston in 1918, the son of Frank Washington and Margaret A. Beck. James was the grandson of’ James Beck” who emigrated from Sussex in 1883.

James attended the Trevallyn Primary School and the State High School, Launceston and entered the firm of chartered accountants, Layh, Hart & Room. He was greatly interested in music and drama and played a lot of tennis. When he was small the family attended St. Oswald’s Church and later were members of St. John’s.

He enlisted in the R.A.A.F. in World War II and was awarded the D.F.C. He was killed in action over Germany on 4th April 1945. At St. Oswalds’s and St. John’s memorials were erected by his family: at St. Oswald’s a brass ewer for the font and at St. John’s a brass plaque and a stained-glass window featuring ‘Michael the Archangel’. The inscriptions are as follows:

Ewer:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF
FlO JAMES BECK D.F.C.
KILLED IN ACTION 4 APRIL 1945

Plaque:

A.M.D.G.
AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF
FLYING OFFICER JAMES BECK D.F.C. R.A.A.F.
KILLED IN OPERATIONS OVER GERMANY BURIED AT ITTERBACH, HOLLAND ERECTED BY HIS FAMILY

Window:

A.M.D.G.
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
FlO JAMES BECK D.F.C. AGED 27
KILLED IN ACTION
ERECTED BY HIS FAMILY
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BECK, James and Amy Florence

James was born in Sussex, England about 1857, the son of George W. Beck and Mary, formerly Watson. The family lived humbly in the little village of Windmill Hill not far from where the Royal Greenwich Observatory stands today, near Herstmonceux in East Sussex. James was one of several children and it is not known where or how he was educated. However, he was apprenticed to a Sussex grocer and later worked in London.

James’ brother, Alfred Beck was the first of the family to migrate to Tasmania. James followed Alfred in 1883, bringing with him his sister Polly, to recover her health. Once settled in Launceston he purchased an established grocery store in Wellington Street; later, in the early 1900s, he took over another store in Charles Street, this too proved to be very prosperous.

On 25th May 1887, James married Amy Florence Pike, born 1864, the daughter of Francis John and Mary Ann Pike, of Hobart. Amy was one of six children; her father was a shoemaker in Liverpool Street, Hobart; her mother’s maiden name was Harrington. They were married at St. George’s Church, Battery Point, but settled at Trevallyn, overlooking the Tamar River and Launceston. They had six children. They became regular attenders at St. John’s Church, and Amy was one of the original members of the Mothers’ Union branch formed there in 1894.

In his business life, James was a foundation member and for a time, president of the Commercial Travellers’ Association and a member of the Executive of the Launceston Bank for Savings. He was interested in farming and was friendly with many midland families. He also played bowls and was a keen gardener.

Amy died on 31st December 1934 and James six months later on 22nd July 1935. Amy died on 31st December 1934 and James six months later on 22nd July 1935. In their memory two separate mosaic panels were given by their son Frank. These were mounted one either side of the reredos behind the main altar. There is no inscription. Also, two plaques of opus sectile mosaic were erected in the baptistry at St. John’s Church. These inscriptions read::

IN MEMORY OF JAMES BECK
IN MEMORY OF AMY FLORENCE BECK
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BENNETT, Henry and Marion

Henry Bennett was born in 1815, the eldest son of Henry Bennett who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land with his three sons, Henry, Samuel and Francis in about 1837. Henry, the father, returned to England after a short time and Francis went to live in Sydney. The two remaining brothers, Henry and Samuel, opened a trading post at the north-west corner of St. John and Brisbane Streets. Much later Samuel returned to England.

Henry lived at ‘Claremont’ in Clarence Street. He married Mary Ann Ring at St David’s Church, Hobart in 1841. They had three sons and three daughters, of whom Marion was one. She did not marry but lived at home with her parents.

Henry Bennett died in Launceston on 22nd September 1900. He and his family had been members of St. John’s Church for many years and during the building extensions at St. John’s, from 1901 to 1911, Marion Bennett donated a window for the chapel in memory of her father. The subject of the window is ‘Christ blesses the little children’. Some years later William Ring Bennett gave the Tasmanian oak pews in the nave of this same church in memory of his aunt, Marion Bennett. No inscription has been placed on these pews, as yet. Some of them were carved by Hugh Cunningham and later Gordon Cumming carved more.

Marion Bennett died on 20th November 1935 at the age of 91 years. The inscription on the window reads:

IN MEMORY OF
HENRY BENNETT OF CLAREMONT, LAUNCESTON
BORN 1815 DIED 1900, AGED 85 YEARS.
‘THE SOULS OF THE RIGHTEOUS ARE IN THE HAND OF GOD.’
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BOYES, Rosetta

Rosetta was born in England in 1822, the daughter of William Henry and Ella Sophia Gough who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land on 25th January 1825.

Rosetta’s father received a land grant at Sorell, but moved to Launceston in 1831 when he took up his appointment as gaol keeper on 4th April. Rosetta and her several brothers and sisters would have been educated at home by their mother.

In 1838, the family had a residence at Paterson’s Plains called ‘Verulam’ and some land at Franklin Village.

On 7th August 1852, Rosetta, aged 30, married Edward Taylor Boyes, third son of George Thomas William Blamey Boyes and Mary, formerly Ediss. At this time George Boyes was Colonial Secretary of Van Diemen’s Land. Rosetta and Edward Boyes had seven children, one of whom, Marion, married John S. Taylor of ‘Valleyfield’.

Edward Boyes was registrar of shipping from 1881 to 1882 and also collector of customs at Launceston. He and his family lived at 134 York Street and attended St John’s Church. Later they moved to Battery Point to live in Kelly Street. There on 24th April 1890, Rosetta Boyes died. In her memory a carved hymn board was given to St. John’s bearing this simple inscription:

IN MEMORIAM ROSETTA BOYES
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BROADLAND HOUSE CHURCH OF ENGLAND GIRLS’ GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

Broadland House has a history going back to 1845. The Examiner newspaper, of 10th January 1846 carried an advertisement reading: “Establishment for young ladies, Sidbury, Paterson’s Plains – Mrs Manley begs to inform her friends that the duties of her establishment will be resumed on Monday, the 12th of January.”

Mrs Manley, formerly Miss Ann Hodgkinson, was born in England about 18ll, and had married Robert Manley in 1836 at St. John’s Church. , ‘Sidbury’ was their home situated near what is now St. Leonards, overlooking the river.

In January 1845 Robert Manley had died and Mrs Manley opened her school. In 1848 she married Clement Buesnell, the French master at the school. In 1872 they moved to Launceston and Annie’s daughter Anne became a teacher at the school.

After several locations the ladies purchased a property, Broadland House, in Elizabeth Street, from Mr Edwin Maxey, a schoolteacher.

In January 1885 Mrs Buesnel, now a considerable age, leased the school to Miss J. C. Hogg who within a few years purchased the property and school. In the ‘Cyclopedia of Tasmania’ (1900, VoI.II), the school is listed as “Broadland House Ladies’ Educational School”, situated in upper Elizabeth Street, Launceston, with fees from one and a half guineas upwards.

Broadland thrived over the years and in 1908 Miss Hogg leased the school to  Miss Mary Hogg, a former pupil, and a good friend and colleague, Miss Henrietta Middleton.

During the regime of these two women the school song, by Miss Mary Fisher, badge and motto, ‘Nisi Dominus Frustra’, were adopted.

At the close of 1914 the school removed to open in Lyttleton Street in a Georgian town house, a building still in use as the administration block of the Launceston Church Grammar School.

In 1925 the school was sold to the Reverend Dr and Mrs Postle, and in 1928 the Church of England in Tasmania purchased the school.

The Church appointed a Board of Management to run the school. The Board was composed of the rectors of the five parishes in Launceston, together with seven leading businessmen of the city.

In 1932 Miss M. L. Rooney was appointed headmistress, a post she held until her retirement in 1963. During her regime many additions were made to the grounds and buildings, and a large section of the old Cypress Street burial ground was taken over for the school oval.

By the end of 1982 four more headmistresses had given a part of their lives in service to Broadland House. Over 1982 and 1983 the school amalgamated with the Launceston Church Grammar School took place and  Broadland became the Broadland Campus housing the junior grades, with co-educational enrolment. The central building is still known as Broadland House.

Late in 1985 a memorial window was installed in St. John’s Church in honour of the school. The subject is ‘Suffer the Little Children’ and the inscription reads:

JESUS SAID, ‘LET THE CHILDREN COME TO ME’
MARK 10:14
(there is the school badge)
BROADLAND HOUSE GIRLS’ GRAMMAR SCHOOL
1845 – 1983

In 2017 the members of the Broadland House Old Girls Association purchased a stained-glass window for the Launceston Church Grammar School Chapel to honour the old school in its present role. At the base of the window are two small panels with the words verse from the Book of Ruth Chapter 1 verse 16:

Where you go I will go,
Your people will be my people,
And your God my God.

The School motto is on a brass plaque beneath the window and reads:

“Nisi dominus frustra.”
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BROWNE, William Henry

A wealth of information is emerging about the life and times of Revd. William Henry Browne. Apart from the present article, there is an excellent summary on the current website associated with Gillian Morris’ edition of the Journal of Revd. William Henry Browne. Follow this link… See also the article in the Australian Dictionary of Biography – Browne, William Henry, 1800-1877.

William Henry Browne was born on 20th August, 1800, at Mallow, Co. Cork, the second but eldest surviving son of Henry Browne, barrister at law, and Isabella Galwey. They lived at Ballinvoher, Castletown, Co. Cork. William Henry was educated at Charleville School and on 6th October 1817, he entered Trinity College, Dublin, intending to study medicine. However, he changed over to theology and took his B.A. in 1822. There is no record in Dublin of his LL.D., but he was always addressed and referred to and signed himself as ‘Doctor’ and the evidence for the genuineness of his doctorate is too strong to be dismissed.

Browne was ordained deacon in 1824, appointed curate of Whitechurch and priested in the same year; he served there for three years. He then sought a colonial chaplaincy. He arrived in Van Diemen’s Land in October, and on 1st November 1828, was gazetted chaplain at St. John’s Church. For some years he was the only clergyman in Northern Tasmania. His parish extended from the mouth of the Tamar to Campbell Town and across to the East Coast; it comprised some 3,800 square miles and about 4,500 souls. He had responsibility for the gaol, barracks for male prisoners and the female house of correction, as well as for the Church; he held six services a week in addition to travelling and general pastoral work. Much of his travelling was on horseback. There being no residence for the chaplain when he arrived, he built himself a house, since demolished, named ‘Bifrons’, on the High Street.

In addition to his spiritual work, the Reverend Doctor showed great interest in education and soon acquired a school, but was forced to relinquish it under pressure from Archdeacon Scott. He was a stalwart evangelical and took a leading part in the controversies over church ritual; he quarreled with Bishop Nixon and for some years was at odds with him.

Browne took no small interest in public and community affairs, principally in establishing the Benevolent Society, the Launceston Church Grammar School, St. John’s Hospital in what is now Morton House, the Mechanics’ Institute and, with the Reverend John West, he played a leading part in the AntiTransportation campaign. As well, he worked hard to establish the post office savings bank system in Tasmania, but his outspoken and sometimes indiscreet comments on other institutions caused bad feelings between Browne and other leading citizens.

Dr Browne was twice married. First, on 3rd September 1829, to Caroline Johnson, second daughter of Richard Willis, of ‘Wanstead’ near Conara; Caroline died at George Town in February 1845 aged 37 years and is buried in the George Town cemetery. Secondly, on 25th June 1846, to Julia Augusta aged 37, youngest daughter of the Reverend John Gavan, rector of Wallstown, Co. Cork. She survived him by twenty-two years and is buried in London. There were four children of each marriage. At his home ‘Bifrons’ on the outskirts of Launceston, the Reverend Doctor and his family were twice attacked by bushrangers, the first time in 1833, the second time was some twelve years later in early 1846. During his incumbency Browne made a number of improvements to St. John’s Church. In these forty years the church was completed and in 1866 enlarged by the addition of a chancel; the first clock was installed in 1830 and the second, still existing, clock with bell, in 1835. The first service of confirmation was held in 1833 by Archdeacon Broughton.

In 1868 Dr Browne resigned because of age and failing health, but when Thomas Reiby resigned in 1870, Bishop Bromby appointed Browne Archdeacon of Launceston, which office he filled until his death on 20th June 1877. He was buried in the Cypress Street cemetery with the simplicity he had always advocated for funerals.

During the construction of the east end of St. John’s Church, Mr Montague Browne, a direct descendant, caused to be erected a monument in the shape of the family arms, carved in sandstone and crafted by Mr Hugh Cunningham. The inscription reads:

THE VEN. W. H. BROWNE LL.D.
RECTOR 1828-1868
ARCHDEACON 1870-1877

Arms:

Sa. on a chev. three lions passant between two bendlets.

Crest:

An eagle displayed.

Motto:

Suivet raison.”

(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BROWNRIGG, Harold Blake

A comprehensive biography of Revd. Marcus Blake Brownrigg can be found in the on-line Australian Dictionary of Biography.  Link to Brownrigg, Marcus Blake (1835–1890)

Harold Brownrigg was born at Launceston in 1875, the youngest son of Canon Marcus Blake Brownrigg,’ rector of St. John’s Church at the time, and of Georgina Shapcote.

In 1879 the Brownrigg family moved into the newly constructed parsonage, as it was called in those days, built next door to the church. The family’s association with the church was to extend for several generations.

Harold was educated at home by his mother. He spent two years at the Launceston High School, which was run by Mr E. A. Nathan in what is now Milton Hall, Frederick Street.

In 1887 the family moved to Queensland owing to the father’s ill health, and four years later they returned to live in Launceston after the Reverend Brownrigg’s death.

Harold became employed at the Postal Department, and took up his association with St. John’s Church again, becoming first a teacher, then the superintendent of the Sunday School. He had a great appreciation of church music and was a member of the choir for forty years. He was largely responsible by his generous donations for the alterations and additions to the organ in the 1930s to 1950s, for example, building the western and southern fronts of speaking pipes.

He was a churchwarden at St. John’s from 1938 to 1955, and for many of those years, rector’s warden. He was also a member of the first Vestry of that church formed in 1935. For many years he read the lessons at Sunday services, and after his retirement he spent much of his time at the church showing visitors over the historic building.

He was an active member of the Church Missionary Society, and a member of the Board of Broadland House School. In his earlier years he was a keen tennis player and, following his father’s great interest in art and photography, Harold became a well-respected amateur photographer. His many pictures of St. Johns Church have been carefully preserved as the Brownrigg Collection’ housed at the church. He was the first to show moving pictures in Launceston, and screenings took place in old St. John’s hall.

On 13th April 1910, he married Louisa Mary Jones, daughter of J. F. Jones. They had two children, Hedley Blake died in infancy and Sybil Mary.

Harold died, after a long illness, on 26th January 1956, and, as a tribute from his fellow parishioners, a full choral funeral service was held at St. John’s. A further section of the great pipe organ was given in his memory, and a brass plaque above the choir stalls bears the inscription:

THE CLARINET STOP IN THIS ORGAN
IS A MEMORIAL TO HAROLD BLAKE BROWNRIGG 1875 – 1956
FOR MANY YEARS CHOIR MEMBER,
SUNDA Y SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT, AND CHURCHWARDEN
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BROWNRIGG, Marcus Blake and Georgina

Marcus Brownrigg was born at Mauritius on 23rd July 1835, the eldest child of Captain Marcus Freeman Brownrigg, R.N. and Maria Caroline Brownrigg, formerly Blake. Captain Brownrigg was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1796. He married Maria Caroline, the daughter of Colonel Blake, at Cape Town, South Africa in 1834.

Marcus was educated at Stroud and the University of Cambridge, where he graduated M.A. He came to Australia with his family on 1st Marc, 1856, and became one of the three foundation students at Moore Theological College, Sydney under William Cowper. He was made deacon on 19th December 1858, by the Bishop of Sydney, who also made him priest on 21st September 1860.

He married Georgina Shapcote, daughter of Commander Shapcote, R.N. to whom he had been engaged before he left England. He worked first in the Lachlan district of New South Wales in 1863, then moved to Albury in 1867 and then on to St. John’s Church, Ross, Tasmania. He was then inducted rector of St. John’s Launceston on 2nd August 1868, and remained there for almost twenty years.

Marcus was a modest man with a fine physique and boundless energy. At St. John’s Church he re-organised the interior by doing away with the old ‘horse box’ pews and installing beautiful cedar pews. The pew rental system was relaxed and pews made open to all worshippers. He printed many of his Sunday addresses, drew up a liturgy with selected hymns for the “Public Services of the Young”. There is still in existence an unpublished manuscript, beautifully written and illustrated by him, on the Genesis account of the Creation.

In 1869 the Mechanics’ Institute elected Marcus as its president. He was an ardent supporter of the Temperance Movement and from 1869 onwards, The Examiner newspaper frequently reported his outspoken addresses.

Marcus became interested in the Mission to the people, especially those living on the Bass Strait Islands. This work had been started by the Anglican Bishop of Tasmania, Bishop Nixon. Marcus made many trips to the Islands. His first in 1872 was in a small cutter called the ‘Freak’. As a result of his work he wrote a book “The Cruise of the Freak”. He made twelve subsequent trips and pamphlets concerning these were printed. In 188 and 1883, he sailed to the islands in a five and a half ton yawl he built himself in the grounds of St. John’s rectory. It is known that he also built at least two canoes and was always his own navigator.

He also made a study of astronomy and built a small observatory in the rectory grounds. In order that he might help his poorer parishioners, he studied homeopathy and ministered to their bodily ills. From his parents he inherited artistic skills and became an artist of considerable merit. His paintings were mostly of the sea, the forest and the bush; there is also an excellent painting of early Launceston, 1878.

He was made a canon of St. David’s Cathedral in 1878, by the then Bishop of Tasmania, Bishop C. H. Bromby.

In 1887 ill health forced him to retire from St. John’s Church and he and some of his family went to live first in Queensland, then in 1890 to New South Wales. He died at Redfern on 31st July 1890.

Marcus and his wife, Georgina, had seven children, one of whom was Harold Blake.

Several years after Marcus Brownrigg’s death, the family erected a pulpit canopy in St. John’s Church as a memorial to their parents. The inscription carved on it reads:

A.M.D.G. AND IN MEMORY OF
THE REV. MARCUS BLAKE BROWNRIGG, M.A.
RECTOR OF THIS CHURCH FROM 1868 to 1886 AND HIS WIFE
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BROWNRIGG, Sybil Mary

Sybil was the daughter of Harold and Louisa Mary formerly Jones, born in Launceston on 29th November 1913. She was also the granddaughter of The Reverend M. Blake Brownrigg and Georgina. Some of Sybil’s education was undertaken at Broadland House School, when in Elizabeth Street. She also attended Zercho’s Business College.

She was one of the very first female Chartered Accountants in Tasmania. She was a member of the Girl Guides, and a life-long member of St John’s Choir. Sybil was the first female elected to St John’s Vestry and for many years taught in the Sunday School, rising to Superintendent. She ran the Church Missionary Society bookshop, once in St John Street.

Sybil died in 1992., and in her memory friends and relatives erected a brass plaque in the south aisle near the Chapel. The Inscription reads,

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF
SYBIL MARY BROWNRIGG, 1913-1992
WHO GAVE LOVING SERVICE TO GOD THROUGH DEDICATION
TO ST JOHN’S CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL, CHURCH MISSIONARY
SOCIETY AND THE WIDER WORK OF GOD’S PEOPLE
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

BUNGEY Alfred and Ada Blanche

Alfred was born in Titchfield, Hampshire, England, on 20th December 1860. He emigrated to Tasmania in the mid-1870s having been apprenticed to the drapery trade in England.

He set up his own business and conducted it from several premises in Launceston, including Brisbane Street, George Street and St. John Street. An advertisement in The Examiner newspaper of December 1932 states that there was for sale at Bungey’s – “Hosiery – pure silk fully fashioned in a full range of colours 6s 11d a pair – gift boxes of envelopes given away with every pair of hose.”

Another item was “Bathing suits – Ladies heavy weight cotton with overskirt, usual price 7s 11d special selling price 2s 6d. Infants all wool bathing suits 2s 6d.”

On 12th April 1899, Alfred married Ada Blanche Coulter. She was born on 27th April 1874 in Launceston. Her parents emigrated from Co. Cork, Ireland. Mr Coulter was police superintendent in Launceston. Alfred and Ada had four children, one of whom married a descendant of the Revd John Youl,'” first clergyman of St. John’s Church. The Bungey family also attended St. John’s.

Alfred died at his home in St. John Street on 13th May 1947, and Ada died on 31st January 1949.

At St. John’s Church, a pair of finely carved flower pedestals was given by the family, one in memory of each parent. The inscriptions read:

IN MEMORY OF ALFRED BUNGEY 1947.”
“IN MEMORY OF ADA BLANCHE BUNGEY 1949
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

CALVER, Clarence Walter and Jessie Violet Harriet

Clarence was born on 12th January 1880 son of George Calver, an engineer, and Eliza Patience, formerly Bricknell, who married at St. John’s Church in 1874. Clarence was one of thirteen children, George having had two wives.

Clarence received his schooling in Launceston and eventually became an engineer working with his father. On 17th December, 1903, Clarence married Jessie Violet Harriet, daughter of Arthur James Passmore, printer, and Jessie, formerly Harding of Bath, England. Hetty, as she was known, was born at Bath in 1875. She did not have any children. All the Calver family worshipped at St. John’s Church and Hetty attended after her marriage.

In 1919 Clarence qualified as a dentist and had his practice at 112 Brisbane Street for the following twenty-five years until he retired in 1945. During World War II he was secretary of the Australian Dental Association. He was involved with the Trevallyn Tennis Club for many years as a member, president and later patron, and was also a member of St. John’s Tennis Club. He was a member of the Druids’ Heart of Oak Lodge and the Masonic Lodge of Hope.

Hetty died in 1941, aged 66. Clarence lived until he was 86 and died on 4th July 1966. In their memory relatives and friends gave a window to St. John’s Church featuring Christ as the ‘Light of the World’. It was placed in the chapel with the following inscription:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF CLARENCE CALVER
1880-1966
AND HARRIET HIS WIFE 1875-1941
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

CAMERON, John

John Cameron came from Bradstead in Kent, England. He arrived in Van Diemen’s Land in 1837. He married Eliza Milbough Snell on 25th February 1837. They travelled from Hobart to Launceston where their first child, Emma, was born on 27th January 1838.

John was a very successful businessman. He was an original shareholder of the Launceston Gas Co., formed in 1858, and was a Justice of the Peace in Launceston and surrounding districts.

He owned a house and land at the bottom end of St. John Street, also Newnham Hall and Oakburn on the Paterson’s Plains Road. As well, he had two grants of land in the country, ‘Hawkridge’ at Snakes Banks (Powranna), and ‘Combe Bank’ near Ben Lomond.

The Cameron family made several journeys back to England, and their youngest child, Kate, was born in London on 4th March 1856.

Emma, the eldest, married Robert Walker, who became Mayor of Hobart.

John was a man of industry, and built several mills in Hobart and Launceston. Ritchie’s Mill was one of these. He also built a flume from the First Basin to the mouth of the Gorge to drive his mill-wheel; during summertime he would sell water by the barrel to needy Launceston householders.

John was a strong supporter of St. John’s Church and was a churchwarden there in 1839 and 1840. A small square chancel was erected at the east end of St. John’s in 1866-68, and Cameron ordered a three-light stained-glass window from Ferguson & Urie of Melbourne, for the new extension. However, he died before it arrived in Launceston and so Emma Cameron presented the window as his memorial soon after in 1866.

When St. John’s was extended in 1901-1911, the small chancel was removed and its windows stored in the tower until 1938 when the walls of the nave were raised. The main section of this window was erected in the south clerestory. The subject of the window is ‘The Ascension’, the work of Ferguson and Urie of Melbourne (1866). The top part of the window was not repositioned but the 3 round features are in the church archive. The inscription has disappeared.

(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

CHRISTMAS, Frank Tasman

Frank was born in 1886, son of Richard Edward Christmas, a grocer of Launceston, and Annie Adelaide, formerly Stuart. Frank was given a local education and moved into Launceston to take up his employment.

He eventually became a maker of the then new apparatus, the venetian blind. Such was his calling in life when on 30th December 1912 he married Maria May Stebbings, born 1888, daughter of Herbert James Stebbings and Sarah, formerly Ralph. Maria, or Myra as the family called her, was a most accomplished costumier and designed and made her own wedding gown and years later another wedding gown for her daughter.

Frank and Myra moved into the old Stebbings home in White Street shortly after their marriage. Frank turned his hand to other aspects of interior decorating, including furniture making and upholstery. They attended St. John’s Church where, in later years, Myra was very popular with the young members of the parish as it is said she always handed out little bags of sweetmeats at special occasions.

Frank died on 10th May 1960. A stained-glass window depicting ‘Pentecost’ was erected in his memory in the chancel of St. John’s. The inscription reads:

A.M.D.G.
IN MEMORY OF FRANK TASMAN CHRISTMAS
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

CLEAVER, Henry Herbert (Fred)

Henry was born in Launceston on 18th December 1876 the second son of John Henry Wilson Cleaver and Sarah, formerly Vaux, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land in the company of his father, George James Cleaver, on 25th July, 1854. Henry, who strongly preferred to be called Fred, was one of four sons who were educated at the Launceston Church Grammar School.

Fred and his brother George” worked for their uncle, Mr J. S. Scarr, in his hardware store at the corner of Charles and Brisbane Streets, Launceston. The brothers eventually took over the store and established “The Cleavers” in 1904. On 11th April 1911 Fred married Mary Justin, daughter of John Justin of Launceston. Fred, Mary and their one son all attended St. John’s Church where Fred was a sidesman and member of the Vestry. He also conducted a boys’ society there. He took special interest in the Launceston Church Grammar School and was a member of the Board of Management. Fred was a Rotarian and served as president of the Launceston Rotary Club.

Fred died at the age of 63 on 19th August 1939 and in his memory the family gave a stained-glass window to St. John’s Church. It features ‘Hope’. The inscription includes his preferred name, and reads:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF (FRED) FREDERICK HERBERT CLEAVER
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)