Memorials 2

COOKMAN, Frederick Harold

Fred was born in Launceston in 1898 and for nearly his whole life was associated with St. John’s Church. Firstly, he was baptised there then, as a small boy, joined the church choristers, at that time conducted by J. H. Fray. In adult life he served the church as sidesman, vestryman and churchwarden, and was secretary to the Vestry for many years.

Fred was educated at the Launceston Church Grammar School and became employed in the warehouse of D. & W. Murray, wholesale haberdashery suppliers of Paterson Street. Fred and his wife Ada had one daughter, June, and lived in Brougham Street.

He died on 28th June 1963 aged 65. Sometime after, the church Vestry purchased a pair of carver chairs. One was dedicated to the memory of Fred Cookman. The inscription reads:

IN MEMORY OF FREDERICK HAROLD COOKMAN CHURCHWARDEN
1950 -1963
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

DAVIS, Dorothy Agnes (Dorrie)

Dorrie was born on 27th September 1906 daughter of Arthur William Davis, commercial traveller, and Clara Cecilia. Dorrie was educated at the Launceston Church Grammar School when it was situated in Elizabeth Street. In those days a few girls were permitted to attend. At school and when she was a young adult, she played a great deal of tennis and won many trophies.

Throughout her working life Dorrie held a number of appointments, mostly of the nursing kind. For twenty-two years she was companion to Miss Ada Harrap. She also worked at St. Margaret’s Nursing Home in York Street and the Fred French Home still in Amy Road. For a few years she was receptionist in the consulting rooms of Dr N. Gollan.

In her retirement, Dorrie concerned herself with the good work of the R.S.P.C.A. She also took over the management of the Church Missionary Society Book Shop in St. John Street. Dorrie died at Low Head on 13th September 1986 and in her memory a silver pyx was presented to St. John’s. The inscription was not available at time of printing.

(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

DEAN, Frances Jean

Frances was born in Launceston on 15th April 1894 the daughter of Thomas John Carr and Ellen Elizabeth, formerly Robinson.

There were three other children. Frances was educated in Launceston and became a teacher’s assistant at a small private school and from about 1910 she became her mother’s assistant at ‘The Towers’ boarding house; in later years she was employed in the retail trade.

In 1915 she married Jack Stanley Dean, son of William Boswell and Helen Dean. The marriage is said to have taken place on Melbourne Cup Day. Frances and Jack had five children, one of whom was Joan Walsh.

With her family Frances attended St. John’s Church and resided at Trevallyn. She was a willing worker on the ladies’ committees at St. John’s and Broadland House School, and during World War I worked for the Red Cross Society.

Frances died in February 1945, and in her memory her family gave an opus sectile mosaic plaque and a vesica window featuring’ John the Apostle’. The inscription on the plaque reads:

A.M.D.G.
AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF FRANCES JEAN DEAN DIED 8TH FEBRUARY 1945.
THE WINDOW ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE CHANCEL
WAS ERECTED BY HER FAMILY
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

DE LITTELOVRE Ranulph

This thirteenth century Englishman is commemorated in the chapel of St. John’s Church by a window entitled ‘The Centurion of the Acts’. Ranulph lived near Chester, on the Welsh Marches, and apparently served in Edward I’s army when that king conquered Wales. The family bore arms; during the 16th century the name was shortened to Littler.

Eighteen generations after Ranulph, one Charles Littler emigrated to Van Diemen’s Land in 1837. He married Ann Summers of Launceston and their descendants have spread into many parts of the island.

The memorial window was placed in 1912 by Frank Mervyn Littler, a parishioner of St John’s Launceston, a grandson of Charles Littler. The inscription reads:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF RANULPH DE LITTELOVRE, WALLERSCOTE, CHESHIRE, ENGLAND, 1284
THIS WINDOW IS ERECTED BY
HIS DESCENDANT FRANK MERVYN LITTLER,
DEDICATED JULY 27, 1912
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

DENHAM, Laurence and Evalynne

Laurence Denham was born on 6th January 1912 to Harry and Evalynne Denham, at Illingsworth, Halifax, in Yorkshire. There were two other sons, Gerald and Eric. Although their parents were Congregationalists, the three boys attended St. Hilda’s Church, Gibraltar Road, Halifax, and were confirmed into the Church of England.

Laurence was educated at the local infants’ school then at Heath Grammar School, Halifax, founded in 1597. When he left school, aged 18, he joined the then Halifax-based knitting wool manufacturers, Patons & Baldwins, as a trainee; he went through all the different departments, such as wool sorting, dyeing, spinning, sales etc. At the age of 21, he was sent out to the firm’s branch in Shanghai, China. He maintained his church interest, attending Holy Trinity Cathedral in Shanghai, and he ran one of the local Scout troops. During World War II he was interned by the Japanese. On his release he returned to England, from where he was subsequently sent to the Patons & Baldwins mill in Launceston, Tasmania, where in 1952 he became general manager.

In Launceston Laurence became a parishioner of St. John’s Church. He joined the choir, singing tenor, and in 1963 was appointed a churchwarden, holding the office until his death. He was also a lay-reader for many years.

Laurence’s main interests lay in music, bush walking, Toc H, and the guidance and training of young people. In Scouting, he was associated with the formation of several troops in and around the city, and both St. Giles and the Roland Boys’ Homes benefitted from his interest in their special needs. As well, he took an active part in setting up the Kelso campsite and the Montgomery Park area. He was a member of Rotary in Launceston for many years.

Laurence’s interest in the arts led to the formation of the Patons’ Players and the Patons’ Highland and Country Dancing Clubs. He also performed with the Launceston Repertory Society and was a staunch supporter of the A.B.C. concert season, and of the National Trust.

He was generous and sincere. Being particularly interested in music, he warmly supported the then organist at St. John’s Church in bringing the choir into the ambit of the Royal School of Church Music, and gave generously to renovate the very fine organ and to improve it by adding a thirty-two foot bombarde. He also gave a beautiful piano for the choir’s use, dedicating it to his mother’s memory, and donated a processional cross of unusual interest, its design being a copy of an iron processional cross in Ethiopia, dating back to the fourth century A.D. His will bequeathed to St. John’s Church not only his holiday home, ‘Quamby Cottage’ at Orford on the East Coast, but also a large sum of money sufficient to enable the parish to build the Parish Centre and the Garden of Remembrance.

Laurence Denham did not marry. He died after a long illness on 5th August 1971. The inscriptions on the memorials read:

Processional Cross:
A.M.D.G.
IN MEMORY OF  PPP
LAURENCE DENHAM
d 5.8.’71
Brass Plate on Organ:
A.M.D.G.
IN MEMORY OF
LAURENCE DENHAM
LAY READER, CHURCHWARDEN,
CHOIR MEMBER
DIED 5-8-’71
HIS BEQUEST MADE POSSIBLE THE ADDITION OF THE BOMBARDE STOP TO THIS ORGAN
Plate on Resler Piano:
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
EVALYNNE DENHAM
WHO DIED ON FEBRUARY 15TH, 1968
THIS PIANO WAS PRESENTED TO ST. JOHN’S CHURCH
BY HER SON LAURENCE
AS A TOKEN OF GRATITUDE FOR HER LONG AND INSPIRING LIFE
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

DRY, Richard

Richard Dry was born on 20th September 1815 at Elphin Farm, the property of his father, also Richard, and Anne Dry. The elder Richard was one of the Irish rebels sent out to Australia after the 1798 Rebellion.

Young Richard received his early education from the Reverend J. Mackersey, Presbyterian minister and master of a private school at Campbell Town. When he was 20, he visited Mauritius and India. He was a keen sportsman and a favourite on the turf.

Governor Franklin persuaded him to take a seat in the old nominee Legislative CounciL He became one of the famous ‘patriotic six’, who in 1845 resigned their seats rather than submit to what was considered as the unconstitutional conduct of the Governor (Eardley-Wilmot). He was one of the most prominent workers in the Anti-Transportation Movement, and when the object aimed at was achieved, Richard was at the forefront of the celebrations to mark that great event.

He was one of the sixteen elected members of the new Legislative Council of 1851, and was chosen Speaker of that gathering. He held that position until 1855 when ill-health forced him to retire.

In 1859, Richard Dry visited England, where he was knighted by Queen Victoria, thus becoming the first Tasmanian born man to be knighted. In 1860 he returned to Tasmania and re-entered Parliament. He became Premier on 24th November 1866, and held office until 2nd August 1869, when he died.

He lies buried under the chancel of St. Mary’s Church, Hagley, which was erected by the colonists as a memorial to him.

Sir Richard married Clara Meredith, second daughter of George Meredith of Cambria on the East Coast, on 27th April 1853 at All Saints’ Church at Swansea. His sister and her family went to live at ‘Elphin’ and he lived at ‘Quamby’ near Hagley, established by his father.

Among many other interests, Sir Richard was one of the original trustees of Hutchins School when the trust was established in 1853. He was also one of the trustees of the Launceston Church Grammar School from 1846 to 1858.

Sir Richard died in Hobart in 1869 and in his memory a plaque of marble was placed inside St. John’s Church, Launceston. The inscription reads:

IN MEMORY OF
SIR RICHARD DRY
BORN IN LAUNCESTON
20TH SEPTEMBER 1815
DIED IN HOBART
2ND AUGUST 1869
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

DRY, William

William Dry was born in Launceston on 5th May 1820 younger brother of Richard, who was to become Sir Richard: They were the sons of Richard and Anne Dry of ‘Elphin Farm’ on the Paterson Plains Road.

William was educated at the school of the Revd John Mackersey, at Campbell Town. He was then sent to England to further his education at Cambridge University and graduated M.A. He was ordained in the Church of England as deacon by the Bishop of London, and as priest by the Bishop of Tasmania, Bishop Francis Russell Nixon.

His first appointment was as assistant curate of Camden Town, London, and after he resettled in Van Diemen’s Land, he acted as locum tenens for the Revd Philip Oalmer, Rural Dean and chaplain of Trinity Church, Hobart. This appointment was for three years. He returned to England then to be curate-in-charge at Minster-in-Sheppy, Kent and then on to Sutton-Valence, also in Kent. He then came back to Van Diemen’s Land where he took up a position at St. John’s Church, Hobart. For a short time he was locum tenens at St. John’s Church, Launceston, from 1851 to 1852.

William’s next appointment was at Longford, where he remained until 1860. Then he travelled back to England and stayed for several years. Some of this time was spent in Edinburgh where he was appointed first secretary and treasurer at the inception of the Edinburgh Diocesan Association for the promotion of Foreign Missions. In 1842 while still in that beautiful city, he married Beatrice Young.

In 1883 William and his wife came back to the colony, now called Tasmania, and were for a time at St. Peter’s Church at St. Leonard’s.

His main interests were in the church, travelling and the Royal Society of Tasmania. He died in Launceston on 13th June 1908 aged 88. In St. John’s Church, Launceston, the present pulpit was dedicated to the priest’s memory. The inscription reads:

REV. WILLIAM DRY M.A.
BORN MAY 5TH 1820
DIED JUNE 13TH 1908
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

 

EARDLEY-WILMOT Stuart, Rosa Cornelia, and Stuart Gerald

Stuart was born in Hobart in September 1847, the second son of Augustus H. Eardley-Wilmot whose father was Sir John Eardley-Wilmot, Governor of Van Diemen’s Land from 1843 to 1846. Stuart’s mother was a daughter of John Dunn, founder of the Bank of Van Diemen’s Land.

Stuart went to England in 1854 with his parents to continue his education.

On his return to Australia in 1864, he spent five years on cattle stations in Queensland and New South Wales, and by April of 1869 was back in Tasmania; he joined the staff of the Commercial Bank in Launceston, then housed in premises in Cameron Street. Stuart lived in Launceston and in 1871 entered into a partnership with John S. Taylor, a wool and grain merchant.

In 1874, Stuart married Rosa Cornelia Johnstone, daughter of William Johnstone, merchant of ‘Beulah’, High Street. This gentleman died in 1874 and Stuart joined with his brother-in-law, W. J. Johnstone, who they carried on the well-established Johnstone family business that had been founded in 1842 but changed its name to Johnstone & Wilmot Pty. Ltd. under which name the firm continues to operate. Stuart’s partnership with Taylor was dissolved and that firm became Taylor Bros. and later the Tasmanian Woolgrowers’ Association.

Stuart was municipal auditor for many years, a post later taken over by the Government; he served on the Marine Board for over fifteen years, was a member of the Board of the Launceston Gas Co., and of the Mt. Bischoff Tin Mining Co. for over fifteen years, and from 1895 to 1906 was a trustee of the Launceston Church Grammar School. He was one of the Executive Committee of the Launceston Bank for Savings, and a commissioner for the Sinking Fund of the Municipal Corporation. He was a founder of the Navy League in Launceston in 1900, and later helped establish branches in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. He was also on the Board of the Cornwall Insurance Co., and was chief representative of the Northern Assurance Co. Ltd.

Stuart lived with his wife at ‘Fiona’, Brisbane Street, in Launceston. They had three sons, Stuart Gerald, Trevor and Parry. The eldest son, Stuart Gerald, was born in 1884, and was educated at the Launceston Church Grammar School. He married Vera Constance Walker on 7th January 1902. He entered the family firm but died in November 1919, thus predeceasing his parents.

Rosa, his mother, died in August 1924 and Stuart, his father, died in June 1932. To their memory three plaques, one of brass, the others of opus sectile mosaic, were erected in St. John’s Church where the family worshipped for many years” These people have close family ties with Sir John Eardley-Willmot, Governor of Van Diemen’s Land 1843-1846.

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF
STUART,
FOR FIFTY YEARS THE HUSBAND OF
ROSA CORNELIA EARDLEY-WILMOT,
FELL ASLEEP 2ND JUNE 1932
TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF ROSA CORNELIA
FOR FIFTY YEARS THE WIFE OF STUART EARDLEY-WILMOT
FELL ASLEEP 17TH AUGUST 1924
TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF
STUART GERALD EARDLEY-WILMOT WHO DIED 12TH NOVEMBER 1919 AGED 35 YEARS

In 1910, Walter Perrin-and the Reverend J. S. Bryers of St. John’s gave four stained-glass windows for the church choir vestry in honour of the Governor Sir John Eardley-Wilmot. Each of these four windows displays the heraldic arms of people whose lives have some significance to St. John’s. Sir John was the sixth Governor of Van Diemen’s Land from 1843 to 1846. The blazon of Sir John’s arms reads:

Arms:
Sa on a Fess Or. between two eagles’ heads couped Ar, as many Escallops Gu.
Crest:
On a wreath of the colours, an eagle’s head couped Ar, in the beak an Escallop Gu
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

EDGINTON, Charles Howard Walsh

Charles was born in 1894, son of Frederick Arthur Edginton and Emma Beatrice, eldest daughter of Charles E. Walsh of Hobart, the family having a daughter and another son, who lived at ‘Everest’ at Exeter.

The first settler of this family to arrive in Van Diemen’s Land was Thomas Edginton, grandfather of Charles, who came from England as a young man of 22 years in 1852. By 1854 he had set up his own business house in Launceston as a grain and general produce merchant.

Returning to Charles, whose birth was recorded in Launceston, it has been established that he attended the Launceston Church Grammar School for several years. At the age of 17 years, however, he died. The cause of his death was not given. The masters and pupils of the Grammar School erected a plaque of opus sectile mosaic in the chapel of St. John’s Church, at which the school had worshipped for many years. The inscription reads:

HIC AMOR
HIC PATRIA
G. H. W. EDGINTON
OB. 12TH NOV. 1911
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

EDWARD VII King of England 1901-1910

Edward was born at Buckingham Palace on 9th November 1841. He was the eldest son of Queen Victoria, his predecessor, and Prince Albert. He succeeded to the throne of Great Britain and Ireland, and as Emperor of India, on 22nd January 1901, aged 59 years.

He was married at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor on 10th March 1863, to Alexandra, daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark.

Edward VII died at Buckingham Palace on 6th May 1910, aged 68, after a reign of only nine years. He is buried in St. George’s Chapel, Windsor, and Alexandra, his Queen, died in 1925.

By public subscription, a window was erected in St. John’s Church, Launceston, in his memory. The subject is ‘Our Lord in Majesty’. The inscription reads:

TO THE GLORIOUS MEMORY OF
HIS MAJESTY KING EDWARD VII
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

EVANS, Ernest Wynne

Ernest was born in Kew, Victoria, in 1905, and evidently was quite well educated. At some time in the 1920s he joined the Church Missionary Society and served in the Emerald River Mission on Groote Eylandt. In 1929 he was given leave to study for Holy Orders and came to Tasmania for that purpose.

For two years he studied, maintaining himself by serving St. John’s parish, Launceston, as assistant curate. He was ordained deacon on 20th December 1931, and priest twelve months later; both ordinations were at St. David’s Cathedral, Hobart.

On 19th January 1933, Ernest married Gwendoline Frewin, daughter of the Reverend J. F. Frewin, vicar of St. Clements, Elsternwick, Melbourne. The Church Missionary Society of Tasmania officially adopted Ernest as its own missionary and he and his wife moved to the Northern Territory to take up the appointment as superintendent of the Emerald River Mission. It was a time of tension in the Northern Territory there having been several murders, first of Japanese fishermen by aborigines and then of a constable sent to apprehend the aborigines. The Northern Territory Administration proposed to send in a punitive expedition but church authorities countered with a proposal for an Arnhem Land Peace Expedition. In this climate of hostility, the carrying of weapons, even by missionaries, was excusable. But it led to the death of the young, recently married priest. He was climbing up some steep cliffs at the foot of Mt. Ellie, on Groote Eylandt, and was following his custom of using his gun as a walking stick. As he was climbing he slipped and fell on the gun which discharged and killed him instantly, the date of this unfortunate occurrence being 15th November 1933. He was aged 28.

Ernest was buried at the Emerald River Mission and a stone cairn, erected in 1937, marks the grave: About the same time a carved oak credence table was placed in the chapel of St John’s Church, Launceston, in his memory. The inscription reads:

IN MEMORIAM
REV. E. WYNNE EVANS
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GEE, Arthur Rock

Arthur Gee was born in Launceston in 1879 and was the eldest child of Richard and Emily Gee, formerly Stewart, of ‘Tara’, 323 Brisbane Street, Launceston. Richard Gee was Mayor of Launceston in 1914.

Arthur received his higher education at the Launceston High School, conducted by Mr E. A. Nathan, in Frederick Street in Milton Hall, now owned by the Baptist Church. Arthur was associated with the family business of booksellers, stationers and agents for ‘Bell’ organs and pianos at 106-108 Charles Street, until his father retired and closed the business.

He had outstanding musical ability and began his career as a church organist at about 12 or 14 years. He played the organ at the Launceston Baptist Tabernacle, and assisted his mother who was organist at both Margaret and Paterson Street Methodist Churches. A few years later he became organist and choirmaster at Margaret Street while continuing to assist at Paterson Street.

Arthur took formal piano study with Mr H. J. Rushfirth and later studied the organ with Mr W. W. Thornthwaite, organist at St. John’s Church.

On 10th January 1906, Arthur married Louise Scott, daughter of Jabez and Susannah Scott, formerly Smithies. They had two children, Lily Irene” and George Rock. The family moved to Burnie where Arthur was appointed organist and choirmaster at St. George’s Anglican Church. Here he established himself as a successful music teacher, and was musical director of the Burnie Amateur Operatic and Dramatic Society. He was also a very keen amateur photographer. Three more boys were born at Burnie.

The Gee family returned to Launceston in 1925 and Arthur became  organist and choirmaster at Paterson Street Methodist Church where he remained for three years. His next appointment was at St. John’s Church as organist and choirmaster from 1928 to 1950. Arthur Gee had a music studio at his home at 171 St. John Street, then at 6 Elizabeth Street, and in the city at Crabtree’s building at the corner of St. John and York Streets. These he shared with his daughter Irene. Arthur Gee also taught at the Launceston Church Grammar School.

In 1940 he was appointed city organist, and had oversight of the Brindley water organ in the Albert Hall. In his earlier years, Arthur was one of the first candidates in Tasmania for examination with the Trinity College of Music. After his return to Launceston, he continued his association with Trinity College, with the great contribution of fifty years’ service.

Arthur Gee was a member of St. Andrew’s Royal Arch Chapter, and a Past Master of Emu Lodge, Burnie. He retired from St. John’s in 1950 and died in Launceston on 29th June 1951, at the age of 72. In June 1955, a new organ stop, a claribel flute of 61 pipes, was added to St. John’s organ, and was dedicated to the memory of Arthur Rock Gee by Archdeacon L. N. Sutton.’ A brass plate was erected in the chancel at St. John’s in his memory. The inscription reads:

A.M.D.G.
THE CLARIBEL FLUTE IN THIS ORGAN
IS A MEMORIAL TO
ARTHUR ROCK GEE ORGANIST 1928-1950
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GEE, Lily Irene

Irene Gee was born in 1907, in Launceston, the only daughter of Arthur Rock,’ and Louise Gee, formerly Scott, of 6 Elizabeth Street. In 1908 the family moved to live at Burnie. Irene received her education at Burnie State and High Schools. She had outstanding musical ability and was taught by her father. She gained her A.Mus.A. and L.T.C.L. diplomas. She taught music in rooms, which she shared with her father, in Crabtree’s building at the corner of St. John and York Streets. She also gave lessons at Broadland House School.

Irene was the official accompanist for the Australian Broadcasting Commission in Launceston and was organist at St. Andrew’s Kirk for some years, deputising at several other churches when free to do so. For a time she was also sub-organist at St. John’s Church under her father.

In addition she was accompanist for the Apollo Male Quartet, which included Messrs Lawson Graham, Norman Dickenson, Schubert Fuller and Arthur Jones, all of Launceston. She also accompanied the Launceston Male Choir which was then conducted by her father, Arthur Gee.

Irene also played in an official capacity at many functions and festivals, and during the World War II years devoted much time to playing at patriotic concerts and always assisted at charitable occasions.

Lily Irene Gee died in Launceston on 3rd December 1945, aged 38.  PPP

In the baptistry at St. John’s Church a plaque was erected and the inscription reads:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF
LILY IRENE GEE
SUB-ORGANIST OF THIS CHURCH.
ERECTED BY HER PARENTS AND BROTHERS
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GEE, Mabel Mary

Mabel Gee was born at ‘Kirkdale Lodge’, Western Junction, on 12th October 1884, the daughter of Henry Gee and Mary Ann, formerly Talbot.

She was educated at Broadland House School for young ladies. Her main interest was music, and she became a music teacher. She moved to live at Evandale, where she taught private students, and was also organist at St. Andrew’s Anglican Church.

In 1940, Mabel Gee moved to Launceston, and lived at 149 George Street. She was a regular member of St. John’s Church. She did not marry, and she died on 28th February 1964 aged 79 years.

The small organ, which stands in the chapel of St. John’s, was at first on loan to the church during the 1910s while G. F. Hopkins- was rebuilding the organ there. Eventually Mabel bequeathed the small organ to St. John’s,

A short time after her death, a niece, Mrs Marjorie Gardner, had a brass plaque placed on the side of the organ. Its inscription reads:

A.M.D.G.
THE BEQUEST OF
MABEL MARY GEE
d.28-2-1964
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GENDERS, Joseph Charles

Family tradition says that the ‘Genders’ originally came from Gendersheim in Central Europe, and that they were Polish Counts with the surname Gendz.

Joseph Charles Genders was born in Birmingham, England, on 4th February 1827, the second child of Henry Genders and Sarah, formerly Luff. He emigrated from England to South Australia, where he married Albina Louisa Perry on 30th January 1854, at St. Mary’s Church, Kooringa. Albina Perry was born on 9th August, 1837.

Joseph Genders established a wholesale business in Adelaide in 1861, in saddlery and ironmongery. In 1881 he moved to Launceston, Tasmania, where he set up the firm to be called later W. & G. Genders Pty. Ltd. It was described as ‘Saddlers, Ironmongers, Importers of Grindery’ in Cameron Street.

In 1869 he transferred the business to two of his sons, William John- and Arthur Gilbert. A few years later a third son, Edmund Bertram, entered the partnership. Members of the family directed the firm until it was taken over by a similar firm, J. & T. Gunn Pty. Ltd., in 1978, and became “Gunns Genders”.

Joseph and his family first lived at ‘Greycliffe’ near Franklin Village in a house built in 1830, once known as ‘Magpie Hill’, and later as ‘Lyndhurst’. Then they lived at 49 High Street, Launceston, at the corner of Adelaide Street. They had thirteen children, all born in Adelaide.

Albina Genders died at Launceston on 26th July 1888, aged 51, and is buried in St. James’ churchyard, Franklin Village.

Joseph Charles survived his wife by almost twenty-six years, dying in Launceston on 29th June 1914, and is also buried in St. James’ churchyard. He is commemorated by a prayer desk in St. John’s Church. The inscription reads:

IN MEMORIAM
JOSEPH CHARLES GENDERS
CARVED AND PRESENTED BY HIS DAUGHTER ADA LILIAN BARRETT
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GENDERS, William John

William Genders was born in Adelaide on 26th May, 1864, the sixth child of thirteen born to Joseph Charles Genders- and Albina Louisa, formerly Perry. The family came to Tasmania in 1881.

William was a partner in the firm of W. & G. Genders Pty. Ltd. In 1898 he was an alderman of Launceston and president of the Chamber of Commerce. He was also a churchwarden at St. John’s Church, a lay representative at Synod, a lay-reader and Sunday School superintendent.

William Genders married Lily Louisa, formerly Westbrook, in 1889. She was born in Launceston, and was the daughter of Joshua Henry and Elizabeth Ann Westbrook, formerly Norman. Her father was a bank manager and the family lived at St. Leonards.

William and Lily had two daughters; one became a teacher at Broadland House Girls’ Grammar School and the second became a deaconess in the Anglican Church and was awarded the M.B.E.

Lily Louisa Genders died in 1892 at Launceston, aged 33. William married again in 1896 to Katherine Mabel Brownrigg in St. John’s Church. She was the daughter of the Revd Canon Marcus Blake Brownrigg” and Georgina, formerly Shapcote. They had no children.

William Genders died at Launceston on 9th January 1901, and  Katherine Genders died at Launceston in 1957.

A marble plaque was erected in St. John’s Church in memory of William, and the inscription reads:

ERECTED BY THE TEACHERS AND SCHOLARS
TO THE MEMORY OF W. J. GENDERS,
FOR 6 YEARS SUPERINTENDENT OF
ST. JOHN’S SUNDAY SCHOOL
DIED JANUARY 1901
‘BLESSED ARE THE PURE IN HEART
FOR THEY SHALL SEE GOD’  MATT.:V.8
‘FOR HE WAS A FAITHFUL MAN AND FEARED GOD ABOVE MANY’ NEH.:Vl1.2
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

 

GEORGE V King of England 1910-1936

George was born at Marlborough House, London, on 3rd June 1865. He succeeded as King of Great Britain and its Dominions, and Emperor of India, on 6th May, 1910, aged 44 years.

He was the eldest surviving son of Edward VII. He married on 6th July 1893, aged 28, Princess May of Teck, daughter of Francis, Duke of Teck, aged 26 years. (She died in 1953.)

King George V died at Sandringham on 20th January 1936, aged 70, after a reign of twenty-five years. He is buried at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor.

At the time of the new King’s accession, the parishioners of St. John’s Church erected a stained-glass window in the sanctuary. Its subject is ‘The Ascension’. There is no inscription.

(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GILL, Douglas Stewart

Doug was born on 24th April 1914, in Murwillumbah, New South Wales, the son of James Stewart Gill and Jessie Stewart, formerly Gourlay. He came to Tasmania with his parents and family of four other children in 1920.

He was educated at the East Launceston Primary School and the Launceston High School and was first employed at the Agricultural Department in Launceston.

On 14th September 1939, he married Shirly Marghritta Robbins, of Sydney. Shirly was born in Devenport, Tasmania, on 26th March 1916. They had two children. During World War II Doug served with the Australian Army with the rank of captain.

After the war he was employed at The Examiner newspaper. Later he was manager of the City Newsagency, in St. John Street, and held this position for many years. He was accountant at Beck’s Timber Pty. Ltd. and then until his retirement in June 1983, he was secretary of St. Luke’s Hospital, in Lyttleton Street.

Doug was well known in sporting circles, especially in hockey. He was past president for twenty years, patron and life member of the Northern Tasmanian Hockey Association; president of the Tasmanian Hockey Association for twelve years up to 1983. In 1956 he was one of the Australian Olympic Hockey Squad. He was a member of the Umpiring and Umpires Appointment Committee of the Australian Hockey Association, and was the first Tasmanian to receive the Australian Badge as hockey umpire. As an umpire he was active until 1980.

Earlier in his career, Doug had been an active member and past secretary of the Northern Tasmanian Badminton Club, a former treasurer of the South Launceston District Cricket Club and a member of St. John’s Church Tennis Club.

He was a member of several service organisations; he was a past president of the Lions’ Club of Launceston, a member of Launceston Jaycees and Rotary Club. At one time he was president of the Northern Division of the Newsagents’ Association, also a member of the Scotch College Council for over twenty-five years, and a member of the Board of St. Luke’s Hospital.

Doug had been a strong churchman and was associated with St. John’s Church since 1922, when he joined the Sunday School and the choir. He remained a member of the choir for sixty-one years. He served as a vestryman for twenty-three years, thirteen of which were as churchwarden.

Doug died on 31st October, 1983, and his ashes have been interred in the Garden of Remembrance at St. John’s Church. A brass plate was given by his family and placed above the choir stalls. The inscription reads:

A.M.D.G.
IN LOVING MEMORY OFDOUGLAS STEWART GILL
1914-1983
CHOIR MEMBER FOR 61 YEARS CHURCHWARDEN FOR 13 YEARS
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GILL, Neil Stewart

Neil Gill and his twin sister Elizabeth, were born on 26th January 1916. Youngest son of James Stewart Gill and Jessie Stewart, formerly Gourlay, Neil was born when the family was living at Wagga Wagga, New South Wales. He was educated at the Charles Street Primary School and the State High School, Launceston. He was employed at the Commercial Printing Department of The Examiner newspaper.

The Gill family were all members of St. John’s Church and Neil was a member of the choir for several years. He played tennis and badminton for the church teams and a member of the Communicants Guild of St. John’s Church.

When World War II began, he joined the R.A.A.F. and trained at Point Cook. He became an air-observer and wireless-operator, and was eventually posted to serve in Singapore. In 1942, his plane was shot down over the east coast of Malaya and he was killed on the day of his twenty-sixth birthday. He was awarded the 1939-1945 Star, the Pacific Star, the Defence Medal and the War Medal, having reached the rank of sergeant.

In his memory the family gave to St. John’s a plaque of opus sectile mosaic which was erected in the Baptistry. The inscription reads:

A.M.D.G.
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
NEIL STEWART GILL R.A.A.F.
AGED 26 YEARS
KILLED IN ACTION OVER MALAYA
26TH JANUARY 1942
FOR MANY YEARS A CHOIR MEMBER OF THIS CHURCH.
ERECTED BY HIS PARENTS, BROTHERS AND SISTERS
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GILL, Shirly Marghritta

Shirly was born on 26th March 1916 at Devonport, Tasmania. She was the daughter of Charles Arthur Robbins and Stella Wade. She was educated at Miss Maguire’s little school in Devonport. The family moved to live with relatives in New South Wales after the untimely death of Charles Robbins, and Shirly completed her schooling including Business College, in Sydney. She was employed in Sydney for several years before taking a holiday in Launceston where on 14th September 1939 she married Douglas Stewart Gill. They had two children.

In Launceston Shirly continued her secretarial career and became heavily involved in the administration of Scotch College, Penquite Road.as secretary and personal assistant to three successive Headmasters, Briggs, Dean and Sykes.

She was a founding member of the Ionion Club, a club for women who were not born in their residential town. The Ionian Club has spread much further than its genesis in Launceston. She attended St John;s Church and was a member of the choir. She was also a member of Innerwheel and was a Lions Lady.

Shirly Gill died on 3rd February 2001. In her memory her family placed a brass plaque in St John’s Church. The inscription reads:

A.M.D.G.
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
SHIRLY MARGHRITTA GILL
1916-2001
A MEMBER OF THE CHOIR FOR SEVERAL YEARS
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GILLES, Emma Jeanette and Mary Ann

Emma, born 1829, and Mary, born 1st August, 1830, were the daughters of Lewis William Gilles and Mary Woodley, formerly

Horne. The church register of St. John’s states that the two girls were second and third daughters, although there is no record of a first child having been baptised.

Emma was buried on 10th May, 1834, aged 5 years, and Mary on 26th October, 1838, aged 8 years. The Gilles had five more children.

Lewis Gilles was noted in Launceston in banking and was the first managing director of the Tamar Bank, founded in 1835. He was also trustee of the Launceston Church Grammar School from 1838 to 1846, the period in which the school was established and eventually opened in July 1846. From 1834 to 1836 he was a churchwarden at St. John’s Church.

In memory of the two deceased daughters, the Gilles caused to be erected a marble plaque in the Narthex of the church. The inscription reads:

A TRIBUTE OF THEIR PARENTS
TO THE MEMORY OF
EMMA JEANETTE AND MARY ANN GILLES,
DAUGHTERS OF LEWIS WILLIAM AND MARY WOODLEY GILLES
LAUNCESTON 1838.
‘SHEW THY SERVANTS THY WORKS AND THEIR CHILDREN THY GLORY’ PSALM 90TH: v.16TH
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GILLETT, Mary Elsie and Fanny Margaret

These sisters are the daughters of George Parramore, pastoralist, and Maria Jane, formerly Oakden, of ‘Wetmore’, Ross.

Mary, the younger, was born in 1871 at Ross. She was suitably educated and on 31st March 1910, married Robert Harry Gillett, co-principal of the Launceston Church Grammar School from 1895 to 1915. Harry was the son of James and Sarah Gillett. Mary and Harry worshipped at St. John’s Church, next to the school in Elizabeth Street.

A daughter, Margaret Curzon Gillett, was born on 31st December 1910, at ‘Stydd House’ in lower High Street, Launceston.

Mary did not survive the rigours of childbirth and died the next day. She was buried in the family vault at ‘Wetmore’. The babe survived however, and eventually married T. G. H. Hogg. Fanny, the elder Parramore daughter and married Robert Harry Gillett. Their nuptials took place on 2nd January 1913. Fanny had two sons and two daughters and died about 1930.

In memory of these sisters two memorials were given. A stained-glass window featuring ‘St. John’, erected in the chapel at St. John’s Church for Mary Elsie, and a beautiful carved altar in the Grammar School Chapel at Mowbray for Fanny Margaret. The two inscriptions read:

Window:
MARY ELSIE GILLETT
DECEMBER 31ST, 1910
Altar:
FANNY MARGARET GILLETT
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GLEADOW, John Ward and descendants

John Gleadow was born in 1801 at Kingston-upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England. At the age of 17 he was articled to a firm of solicitors and attorneys at Hull, England. He remained there until 1823, then hearing of the new settlement in Van Diemen’s Land, he made plans to emigrate.

He arrived in Hobart on the ship ‘Andromeda’, in September 1825. The following March he was admitted to the Bar of the Supreme Court of Van Diemen’s Land, and later in 1826, he married Dianna Harriet Keaston, who also arrived on board the ‘Andromeda’ and was the daughter of a London solicitor. The Gleadows spent a year in Hobart during which time their first child Robert was born. He died in December 1859, aged 33. They moved to Launceston where John set up his legal practice, becoming the town’s first resident practitioner. He also opened a warehouse and built a residence in St. John Street in 1829. In 1837, John entered into a partnership with William Henty. This firm was to become the present day concern of Ritchie & Parker, Alfred Green & Co.

The family grew to five sons and four daughters. George Thomas was born in 1828; he had two sons, Robert Hartley who died aged 11 and George Dalrymple, of whom later. The family became followers of John Wesley and joined the congregation of the Wesleyan Chapel in Paterson Street in 1834. In 1837 John became secretary of the Sunday School and eventually its superintendent. He was instrumental in the establishment of a chapel and school at Morven, now Evandale. He was active in many other church and charitable interests such as the Wesleyan Mission Society, the Benevolent Society, St. John’s Hospital, Launceston, and the Anti-Transportation Movement.

John was interested in agriculture and horticulture. He was an importer of horses and was one of a committee who, in the 1830s, founded the Cornwall Turf Club. He owned a great deal of land for farming and was a director of several companies. He was Member of the Legislative Council for Cornwall from 1851 to 1854 and Member of the House of Assembly for Morven from 1866 to 1869.

John died on 2nd August 1881; his wife Dianna predeceased him four days earlier.

From the illustrious beginning the Gleadow family has spread in the ensuing century and a half, several children surviving only a few months, but others continuing the family traditions. One such was George Dalrymple, grandson of John Ward. He was born in 1863 and attended the Launceston Church Grammar School. As a boy he lived with his parents at ‘Harland Rise’, the Gleadow farm near Morven.

George joined the National Bank of Tasmania in 1880, worked his way through the stages of employment and in 1898 became manager. He married Jessie Louise Pike, eldest daughter of Dr Charles Pike of Launceston. George and Jessie had four sons and one daughter, and lived in Frederick Street. George was well known in banking and legal circles. He was a member of the Rotary Club, the Chamber of Commerce and the Northern Law Society. He was well respected in the Wesleyan Church and Church of England.

In memory of John Ward Gleadow and all his descendants, a memorial in the form of a beautiful carved prayer desk was placed in St. John’s Church. It bears the inscription:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF
THE GLEADOW FAMILY
THE GIFT OF EMILY MARTIN
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GREEN, Arthur and Florence

Arthur was born in 1842 and died in 1924, he married Florence Weedon, daughter of C. J. Weedon; they had five children. He was secretary and manager of the Launceston Gas Co. He donated two large brass gasoliers to St. John’s Church; these were subsequently sold and the proceeds used to erect a family memorial window in the choir vestry of the church.

The children of Arthur and Florence gave the stained-glass window featuring ‘St Matthew’ in memory of their parents It is in the south ambulatory. The inscription reads:

A.M.D.G.
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
ARTHUR AND FLORENCE GREEN
THE GIFT OF THEIR CHILDREN
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

GREEN, Richard, Alfred, Francis, Arthur and Edwin

These five were the sons of Richard Green and Hannah, formerly Jackson. They were all born in Launceston and attended the Launceston Church Grammar School. There were two more children in the family who died in infancy. Each son in his turn gave a great deal to the community, education and charities.

Richard, born in 1836, died in 1933. He was a very generous supporter of St. John’s Church and made cash donations. He was a prominent citizen in the commercial world of Launceston. He never married.

Alfred, born in 1838, died in 1912. He was a founder of the legal firm of Ritchie & Parker, Alfred Green & Co. He married Rose Barnard. His son, Alfred Lawrence, and grandsons, Richard Martin and Alfred John Green, followed him in the firm. Alfred was closely associated with St. John’s Church and was a churchwarden for four years, and trustee of the Launceston Church Grammar School from 1870 until his death.

Francis, born in 1840 and died in 1905, did not marry.

Arthur, born in 1842 and died in 1924, married Florence Weedon, daughter of C. J. Weedon; they had five children. He was secretary and manager of the Launceston Gas Co. He donated two large brass gasoliers to St. John’s Church; these were subsequently sold and the proceeds used to erect a memorial window in the choir vestry of the church.

Edwin Jackson, born in 1845 and died in 1931, married Lucie McNicol; they had seven children. He went to South Australia and managed a large pastoral firm.

The several memorials to the family are the window in the choir vestry of St. John’s showing the arms granted to the four sons of Richard Sr.:

Arms:
Ar., between two bendlets nebuly Sa.,
a Lion pass ant between two crosses paty, Gu., the whole between as many Escallops of the second (the younger sons bearing the usual marks of cadency).
Crest:
On a Wreath of the Colours, in front of a cubit Arm
erect Ppr. The Hand grasping an Anchor in
bend sinister, Sa. A Cross Paty between
two Escallops, Or.
Motto:
Je Ferai Bien
The brass in the chapel of St. John’s bearing the arms as above and the inscription reading:
TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF
ALFRED GREEN
BORN APRIL 18TH 1838
DIED SEPTEMBER 5TH 1912
AGED 74
ERECTED BY HIS FELLOW WARDENS
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The window showing ‘St. Matthew’ is in the south ambulatory of St. John’s. The inscription reads:

A.M.D.G.
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
ARTHUR AND FLORENCE GREEN
THE GIFT OF THEIR CHILDREN
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)