Memorials 4

PARRAMORE, George and Maria Jane

The Parramore family arrived in Van Diemen’s Land in 1823. They were granted land in the Ross district and their property became known as ‘Wetmore’. The first two landowners were George and Thomas Parramore. After becoming established in the district, Thomas purchased another Ross property ‘Beaufront’, from the Smith family and settled there.

George Parramore had a grandson, George, born at Ross in 1843. He married Maria Jane Oakden at St. John’s Church, Launceston. Maria was the daughter of Phillip Oakden of Launceston and Georgiana of the Cowie family of ‘Brookstead’ near Avoca. They had two daughters. The family property was developed as a fine sheep stud of Saxon breed from a modest beginning in 1825. The principal interest, employment and recreation for George was sheep breeding. Today, it is descendants of the Parramore daughters, the Gilletts, who now run ‘Wetmore’ as a pasture for sheep, cattle and angora goats.

Both George and Maria died young. He was only 50 years old when he died on 1st October 1893 and Maria was 49 years old when she died on 10th August 1896. In their memory the family gave a stained-glass window, featuring ‘The Crucifixion’, to St. John’s Church for the chapel. The Parramores and the Oakdens had reserved pews in the church for many years. The inscription on the window reads:

GEORGE PARRAMORE OCTOBER 1ST 1893
MARIA JANE PARRAMORE AUGUST 10TH 1896
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

PAXTON, Alan Hargreaves

Alan was born in 1942, the son of George and Betty Paxton, formerly of India. Alan lived but one year and was buried in a small grave in Karachi Cemetery.

Originally the Paxtons came from Scotland and it was a great-grandfather of Alan who first came to Australia in the days of the Victorian gold rush. Not having made the fortune he hoped, he returned to Scotland. On the way the ship was wrecked and the survivors taken to India. Adam Paxton was one of these, and decided to stay. His grandson George married Betty, an English girl, and they had two children.lan and Alan.

After India gained her independence, the Paxtons settled in Kenya, East Africa, where they stayed for fifteen years. The Paxtons eventually settled in Tasmania. In aunceston they attended St. John’s Church and they have given a chalice as a lasting memorial to Alan Hargreaves Paxton. The inscription reads:

A.M.D.G.
ALAN HARGREAVES PAXTON
1942-1943
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

PERRIN, Cyril Aubrey

Cyril was born in Launceston on 4th July 1885 eighth child of eleven born to Walter Perrin” and Henrietta Kate, formerly Wilson. His grandparents, Henry and Elizabeth Perrin came to Tasmania in 1860.

He received his education at the Launceston Church Grammar School where he was a keen footballer. On leaving school he was employed by W. & G. Genders Pty. Ltd.  becoming manager in later years.

On 15th February 1906 he married Lillian Minna Thompson, daughter of H. Thompson of Invermay. Cyril and Lillian had three daughters. The family lived at 115 High Street where he had a beautiful garden and also an orchard at Hillwood. He was a member of the Launceston Horticultural Society, and for a time its vice-president, exhibitor and rose judge. He was also a member of the Council of the National Agricultural and Pastoral Society.

The family attended St. Aidan’s Church where Cyril was superintendent of the Sunday School for twenty-nine years. He also had the distinction of being St. Aidan’s first churchwarden. He was a trustee of Christ College and a member of the Church Missionary Society.

Cyril was elected to the Board of the Launceston Homeopathic Hospital Lyttleton Street.

He took an active interest in the Grammar School as a member of the Old Grammarians’ Lodge and the School Board. He was one of a special committee formed to raise funds to enable the school to move from Elizabeth Street to its present site at Mowbray. He also took an interest in public and civic affairs and was an alderman of the city for a number of years.

Cyril died on 26th July 1953. In his memory his family gave to St. Aidan’s Church a stained-glass window featuring ‘St. Aidan’ and below it a granite plaque bearing the inscription:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF
CYRIL A. PERRIN
SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT 1905-1934
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

PERRIN, Walter and Henrietta Kate

Walter was born at Kensington, London, on 9th March 1841 the ninth child of Henry Perrin and Elizabeth, formerly Pearce. Walter emigrated to Australia about 1860 and eventually settled in Launceston.

He had been trained in the drapery trade in England and in 1871 he formed a partnership with James Pepper” and founded the firm of Pepper & Perrin. This was dissolved in 1902 but Walter Perrin remained in the business in Brisbane Street.

On 14th May 1868 he married Kate, daughter of F. J. Wilson of BoPeep’, Cressy. They had nine children, four sons who all at some time maintained the drapery firm, and of the five daughters, only one married.

For many years Walter was one of the leading members of St. John’s Church. He took an active interest in the extension of the church and was a member of the Extension Fund Committee formed in 1892. He was a churchwarden for over twenty years, a member of the Diocesan Council and Synod, and a layreader. He was also local treasurer for the British & Foreign Bible Society.

He was an active member of the Board of the Launceston General Hospital, the Chamber of Commerce and the Tourist Association. He also held directorships with the Tasmanian Permanent Executors & Trustees Association, the Launceston Gas Co. and the Derwent & Tamar Assurance Co. He was also a founder of the Union Jack Gymnasium Club and was responsible for the extension of St. John’s Church Hall where the club met. He also wrote several articles on the History of Launceston for the Launceston Examiner newspaper and presented lectures at the Mechanics Institute.

Walter died on 8th April 1915 having lived 74 years, and Kate died on 3rd April 1924 aged 76. Although they had four sons, their only grandson was killed in action on 2nd December 1942. He was not married and the name Perrin has passed from Launceston.

In their generosity the Perrins gave to St. John’s Church ‘The Great Rose Window’ above the Westminster Gallery.

In memory of Walter, his family gave a marble plaque surrounded by carved native flora. The plaque is in the chapel at St. John’s and is inscribed:

WALTER PERRIN
BORN 9TH MARCH, 1841
DIED 8TH APRIL, 1915
OVER 20 YEARS WARDEN OF ST. JOHN’S CHURCH
FOREMOST IN THE WORTHY WORK OF REBUILDING THIS CHURCH,
HAS LEFT IT TO OTHERS WORTHILY TO COMPLETE
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

POULETT-HARRIS, Richard Deodartus

Richard Poulett-Harris was born at Sydney, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, on 26th October 1817. He was the eldest son of Charles Poulett- Harris and Anna Maria Van Stout, daughter of the Honorable R. Van Stout of Nova Scotia. Charles Poulett-Harris was at that time a captain in the 60th Rifles.

Richard was educated in England at Manchester Free Grammar School, and then graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge. His first appointment was as vice-principal of Huddersfield College. He remained there only a short time, and was ordained deacon at Chester by Bishop Sumner, later Archbishop of Canterbury, and made priest two years later at Manchester, where he was given a curacy.

On 25th June 1844 the Reverend Harris married Catharine Prior Hall, eldest daughter of William Hall of Cambridge. There were six children of the marriage. Catharine died on 27th June 1856 at Blackheath.

In 1849, the Reverend Harris was appointed classical master of the Blackheath Proprietary School for seven years. He emigrated to Tasmania after his wife’s death in 1856, and his arrival in Hobart coincided with the first occasion of the city being lit with gaslight.

The Reverend Harris was appointed rector of the High School, Hobart, and retained this position until his retirement in 1885.

On 13th June1858 he was married a second time to Elizabeth Eleanor Milward, the eldest daughter of John Milward, of Tessierville, Hobart. There were five children of this marriage.

When Harris retired, the family went to live at Woodbridge, Peppermint Bay. He spent many of his holidays in Launceston and attended St. John’s Church. He was a member of the Freemasons and assisted at the opening of the masonic premises in Brisbane Street in June 1884, delivering the address on that occasion.

He was interested in the British & Foreign Bible Society, and was a most prolific writer on all manner of subjects. For the Union Steamship Co. he wrote, “A Visitors Guide to Tasmania”, and for a national volume entitled “Picturesque Australia”, he wrote the Tasmanian section. These are just a few items that remain from his vast private library and manuscripts which were destroyed by fire in 1896.

The Reverend Richard Deodartus Poulett-Harris died in Tasmania on 23rd December 1899 aged 83. In Launceston he was held in great esteem, and a stained-glass window was erected to his memory in St. John’s Church. It was placed in the centre window of the old north wall. During the 1901-11 building period, the window was removed and stored and later re-positioned in the new chapel south wall. The subject of the window is ‘The Call of St. Andrew and St. Paul’. Its inscription reads:

IN MEMORY OF
THE REV’D RICH’D POULETT-HARRIS M.A. CAMBRIDGE,
FOR 30 YEARS RECTOR OF THE HIGH SCHOOL HOBART
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

PRATT, Geva Claudia

Born Geva Claudia Bullock, Geva was the third child of’ Edward Alfred Bullock and Ada, formerly Meadowcroft, who were married at St. John’s Church on 22nd March 1911.

The family moved to Sheffield and the children attended the Mole Creek School, then the Launceston High School where Geva won a probationary scholarship. She did some teacher training at Westbury School and then attended the Teachers’ Training College and the University in Hobart for two years. She began her teaching career at the East Launceston State School.

On 13th October 1945 Geva married Richard Stewart Pratt at St. John’s Church.

She was transferred to the Albuera Street State School in Hobart as a demonstration teacher until 1951.

She died on 8th July 1951 and is buried at the Cornelian Bay Cemetery.

In her life at St. John’s Church, she had attended the Sunday School and became a teacher there. She was also confirmed there.

Several years after her death a pair of flower stands was made for the church, one of them was given in memory of Geva by her sister, Alice. The inscription reads as follows:

IN LOVING MEMORY OF
GEVA CLAUDIA PRATT.
ALICE BULLOCK.
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

ROACH, Arthur Frederick

Arthur Frederick Roach was born in 1905, in Addleston, England. He came to Australia as a teenage boy, alone, under the ‘Big Brotherhood’ scheme, and went to work on several outback properties.

He joined the Army Medical Corps in New South Wales at the outbreak of World War II. He was  a prisoner-of-war of the Japanese, and worked on the dreaded Burma Railway until the end of the war. He survived and returned to Australia.

In March 1946 Arthur visited England and there he married Jean Maynard of Kent. In the following year they returned to South Australia; later they visited and eventually settled in Tasmania in 1952.

Arthur was employed as catering manager at a Commonwealth Hostel at Mowbray. Later he became chief steward at the Northern Club, and for a time he worked at The Cleavers hardware store at the south-west corner of Brisbane and Charles streets.

He was a Freemason for many years and became a member of the Board of Management of the Fred French Nursing Home in 1963.

In 1975, as a member of the Lawrie Abra Memorial Lodge, he was awarded the Masonic ‘Order of Merit’.

He was a member of the Vestry of St. Paul’s Church, also All Saints’ Church, Exeter, and Holy Trinity Church, Launceston. From 1960 until his death in 1978, he was a regular attender at St. John’s Church, Launceston.

Arthur Roach died in Launceston on 9th August 1978 aged 73 years.

Mrs Roach gave a pair of brass vases to St. John’s Church for use in the chapel. The inscription on one of them reads:

A.M.D.G.
IN MEMORY OF
ARTHUR FREDERICK ROACH
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

ROBINSON, Matthew Edward and Mary McEwan

Matthew was born in Northallerton, Yorkshire, England, on 30th January 1850. As a small boy he journeyed with his parents to New Zealand. There he received his education and was taken into the firm of Messrs Clarke & Co., softgoods warehousemen, who operated from several centres.

In 1871, Matthew moved to Victoria to the firm of Dodgshum, Sons & Co., warehousemen of Flinders Street, Melbourne. Six years later in 1877 he was sent to the firm’s Launceston branch, operating under the name of James Dodgshum & Sons.

Some years later Matthew began his own business as a wholesale merchant, trading under the name of M. E. Robinson & Co. of Paterson Street. In the 1920s he expanded the business to manufacturers’ agencies.

He married Mary McEwan Liddle, daughter of John Liddle. She came to Tasmania with her parents while still a child and the family first settled at Forth. Mary was born on 19th May 1855 at Alva, central Scotland. Matthew and Mary had four children. The family lived in Elphin Road and attended St. John’s Church.

Matthew was superintendent of the Sunday School for many years. From 1889 to 1893 he was a churchwarden and for several years was a lay preacher. In 1889 he was appointed a magistrate. In his early days he was a member of several choral societies in town and was a foundation member of the Commercial Travellers’ Association and served on its committee and was president in 1918. For three years from 1914 he was an alderman of the city and from 1903 to 1906 was the Member of the House of Assembly for West Launceston.

Mary was an original member of the National Council of Women, the Queen Victoria Hospital Committee and the Victoria League. She was also secretary of the Hospital Committee for a number of years.

Matthew died on 16th February 1928 and Mary died on 25th May 1930. In their memory a plaque of opus sectile mosaic was erected in St. John’s Church. The inscription reads:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF
MATTHEW EDWARD AND MARY McEWAN ROBINSON GENEROUS CONTRIBUTORS
TO THE EXTENSION OF THIS CHURCH.
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

ROBSON, Thomas Keith McLeod

Thomas Keith was born in 1895, son of T. K. and M. F. Robson of Launceston. He was educated at the Launceston Church Grammar School achieving good results at his studies and sporting activities. On 10th December 1914 he enlisted with the A.I.F. and served with the 15th Battalion overseas and was killed at Gallipoli in 1915. The Robsons were members of St. John’s Church and Thomas attend- ed Sunday School there. After his death the family erected a plaque in the church. The inscription dedicated to the young soldier’s memory reads:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF
THOMAS KEITH McLEOD ROBSON
15TH BATT. AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND ARMY CORPS,
WHO DIED FOR HIS COUNTRY
MAY 2ND 1915, AT GALLIPOLI,
AGED 20 YEARS.
BE THOU FAITHFUL UNTO DEATH
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

ROONEY, Marjorie Lorna

Marjorie Rooney was born in Western Australia in 1899, and was one of four children. Her father was the principal of the Teachers’ College of Western Australia. Marjorie was educated at Perth Modern School, and graduated B.A. from the University of Western Australia. After some time spent teaching, she became principal of the Claremont Girls’ High School.

Marjorie had a friend, Ethel Street; they attended school and university together and in 1932 the two friends came to Tasmania. Marjorie was appointed headmistress of Broadland House Church of England Girls’ Grammar School.” Ethel Street became one of the senior teachers there.

Miss Rooney devoted thirty-two years of her life to teaching at Broadland House. Altogether hers was a life of service to education and this was recognised by the award ‘of the M.B.E. She was a member of the Australian College of Education, she was involved in the Independent Schools’ Headmasters and Headmistresses Association and the Australian Federation of University Women, the Northern Tasmanian Branch of which honoured her with life membership. She was president of the Broadland House Old Girls’ Association for many years and they also made her a life member.

Miss Rooney was a past president of the Soroptomists Club, and a member of the State Executive of the Girl Guides Association in Tasmania. She had a long interest in sport and was president of the Northern Tasmanian Women’s Hockey Association. After her retirement from Broadland House, she played croquet at the East Launceston Croquet Club.

While she was at Broadland House, Miss Rooney lived in the headmistress’ cottage at 8 Lyttleton Street. On her retirement she moved to a house in Penquite Road, opposite Scotch College.

Miss Rooney died in Launceston on 27th April 1983 aged 84. A memorial plaque was placed in St. John’s Church in her memory and one of the large cast iron badges from Broadland House was erected beside the memorial. The inscription reads:

A.M.D.G.
IN MEMORY OF
MARJORIE L. ROONEY M.B.E. B.A. M.A.C.E.
HEADMISTRESS BROADLAND HOUSE
C. OF E. GIRLS’ GRAMMAR SCHOOL 1932-1963
EXCEPT THE LORD BUILD THE HOUSE,
THEY LABOUR IN VAIN THAT BUILD IT. PS.127:1.
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

STEBBINGS, Sarah

Sarah was born on 27th June 1862 to Thomas Farmer Vilder Ralph and Caroline, formerly Stuart. Sarah married Herbert Stebbings in 1885, and bore several children who later settled in Launceston.

Sarah lived for thirteen years after her husband died and she died on 12th January 1954 aged 91. In her memory a stained-glass window portraying ‘St. Luke’ was erected in the south ambulatory at St. John’s, inscribed:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF
SARAH STEBBINGS 1862 -1954
THE GIFT OF HER CHILDREN
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

STEBBINGS, Herbert J.

Herbert was born on 16th July 1861 at Deloraine, son of James Stebbings, a farmer, and Sarah Anne, formerly Dixon, who both arrived in Tasmania from England in July 1857. Herbert was given a local education and worked for many years on his father’s holding at Westbury. On 27th April 1885 he married Sarah Ralph, daughter of Thomas Farmer Vilder Ralph and Caroline, formerly Stuart. The family moved to Launceston and lived a few years in White Street. About 1900 Herbert was appointed sexton at the Cypress Street Burial Ground, and when it was closed in 1905, he became caretaker at Carr Villa Cemetery and moved to a cottage provided there. On the day of the opening, the first funeral there took place, for which he dug the grave, and from that day until he retired on 30th April 1936, he saw the interment of 10,303 persons. He also supervised the planting of many shrubs, gardens and lawns about the cemetery. For many years, every Sunday, Herbert and Sarah made the long PPP journey on foot from Carr Villa to St. John’s Church to attend service. Their children were involved in the activities at St. John’s and several PPP of them married there. Herbert died on 19th April 1941 aged 79 and in his memory stained- glass window depicting ‘The Good Shepherd’ was placed in PPP the south ambulatory next to his wife’s memorial. A credence table PPP was also given in memory of Herbert. The inscriptions read:

Window – The Good Shepherd
TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF
HERBERT JAMES STEBBINGS 1861 – 1941.
Creedence Table
“IN MEMORY OF HERBERT JAMES STEBBINGS 1861 – 1941.
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

STEEDMAN, Alice Marion

Alice was born in 1864 in Victoria, sister of Ada who married the Reverend David Ross Hewton. In 1921 the Hewtons were appointed to St. John’s Church, Launceston, and Alice came to live with them at the rectory. Another sister, Ella, also lived in Launceston.

Alice was involved in many church activities as a member of the choir and Girls’ Friendly Society. She was also a competent pianist and was always in great demand.

The Hewtons retired from St. John’s in 1933 and took up residence in High Street and there on 17th September 1936 Alice died aged 71.

In her memory at St. John’s Church a carved hymn board was erected in the pulpit. The simple inscription reads:

IN MEMORIAM ALICE STEEDMAN.
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

STEPHENSON, Cyril Charles

Cyril was born in 1896, the son of William and Ann Stephenson of Canning Street; William was a book binder. The family worshipped at St. John’s Church and the children attended the Sunday School. Cyril was a member of the St. John’s Cadet Corps which met regularly. On 3rd April 1911 he was fatally wounded at rifle practice. He was taken to the Mission House in Canning Street and died there from his wounds.

In his memory friends erected a brass plaque in the baptistry of St. John’s. The inscription reads:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF
CYRIL CHARLES STEPHENSON,
CORPORAL OF ST. JOHN’S CADET CORPS,
WHO WAS ACCIDENTALLY SHOT
AT RIFLE PRACTICE ON THE EVENING OF
MONDAY APRIL 3RD, 1911.
THIS BRASS WAS PLACED BY HIS COMRADES.
A GOOD SOLDIER OF JESUS AT REST
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

SUTTON, Leonard Neville

Leonard Sutton was born on 25th August 1899 at St. Kilda, Victoria, the son of Frank and Isobel Sutton. While still a child his family moved to Sydney, where Leonard attended the St. Andrew’s Cathedral Choir School; later he achieved the distinction of being the first boy from the school to become precentor of the Cathedral. Having graduated B.A. from the University of Sydney, he attended Moore Theological College and graduated Th.L. with Second Class Honours. He was made deacon in 1925 and ordained priest in 1926. In the following year he was awarded a Lucas-Tooth scholarship, enabling him to study at Jesus College, Oxford, where he gained his M.A. degree. In 1930 the Reverend Leonard Sutton returned to Sydney in the dual capacity of precentor of St. Andrew’s Cathedral and headmaster of the Choir School. Four years later he moved to the King’s School, Parramatta, as chaplain. His next appointment, in 1937, was as vice-principal and chaplain at Brighton Grammar School, Victoria. In 1939 the Reverend Sutton returned to New South Wales to the work of parish priest, first as locum tenens at St. Oswald’s, Haberfield, then six months later in June he was inducted as rector of St. John’s, Ashfield, where he remained for ten years.

In 1949, in his fiftieth year, the Reverend Sutton became rector of St. John’s Church, Launceston, Tasmania, and in 1953 was appointed Archdeacon of Launceston. In 1961 he went to St. Andrew’s, Evandale, as rector but continued as Archdeacon of Launceston. Two years later he was appointed Vicar-General of the Diocese. On 30th August 1930 he married Kathleen Huntingdon, daughter of the Reverend Edward and Mrs Nettie Walker; there are two children, Patricia and David. Archdeacon Sutton died on 8th November 1966. His ashes were placed in the sanctuary wall of St. John’s behind a memorial plaque. The inscription reads:

IN MEMORY OF
LEONARD NEVILLE SUTTON
D. 8TH NOVEMBER 1966
RECTOR OF ST JOHN’S 1949-1961,
ARCHDEACON OF LAUNCESTON 1953-1966,
VICAR-GENERAL 1963-1966,
WHOSE ASHES ARE DEPOSITED
IN THIS SANCTUARY WALL
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

TAYLOR, Marion

Marion was born in Launceston about 1857, one of seven children Edward Taylor Boyes and Rosetta, formerly Gough. The Gough family emigrated to Van Diemen’s Land in 1825. One of Marion’s brothers, George, was one of the early white settlers of Flinder’ s Island.

Marion married John S. Taylor of ‘Valleyfield’, Campbell Town. He was the sixth child of Robert Taylor and Marion, formerly Ralston. Marion and John did not have any children.

After the death of her husband, Marion moved into Launceston and settled in Clarence Street. She returned to St. John’s Church where she had worshipped before her marriage. Marion died on 29th July 1935 aged 78. At St. John’s Church in her memory a stained-glass window, featuring ‘Compassion’, was erected a few years later. The inscription on the window reads:

LOVE NEVER FAILETH
TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF
MARION TAYLOR
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

UNSWORTH, Frederick Richard

Frederick Unsworth was born in Manchester, England, in 1859. He was educated there and when he was 21 he came to Tasmania.

He first joined the firm of Messrs Huybers & Hammond, wholesale merchants of Hobart. He then went to John Hamilton & Co., also wholesale merchants of Hobart.

After a short while he moved to Launceston and set up a mining and commission agency with David Collins of Evandale. This business did not survive very long, and Frederick Unsworth went back into the wholesale trade by joining the firm of Lindsay Tulloch & Co.

Later he became managing director of Irvine & McEachern, wholesale grocers and wine merchants in Brisbane Street, remaining there until just before his death in 1928.

Frederick Unsworth was on the Board of the Mechanics’ Institute for twenty-six years and was president for the last nineteen years. He was president of the 50,000 League, a Justice of the Peace, and a member of the Lodge of Hope for twenty years. He was a member of the Executive of the Benevolent Society and chairman for several years.

Mr Unsworth was interested in a wide range of sporting activities. He was a member of the Launceston Golf Club, he played cricket and was president of the A.B.C. Bowling Club, and for thirty years was a member of the Northern Tasmania Athletics Association.

He was a member of St. John’s Church choir, and later the choir of St. Paul’s Church. He was intolerant of long-winded sermons and, when he considered the service had gone on for long enough, would indicate this in no uncertain manner. Taking out his large ‘Hunter’ pocket watch, he would consult it, then hold it up so that his wife and daughters could see it. On this signal, the four of them would rise and quietly, but determinedly, make their exit, the ladies from the congregation, father from the choir.

On 24th December 1880 he married Annie Knight of Hobart. They had two daughters, Edith and Lucy, who both lived in Launceston, and a son Harry, who resided in Sydney.

The Unsworths lived at 7 Balfour Street, Launceston.

Frederick Richard Unsworth died on 31st October 1928 aged 69 years. A brass plaque was erected in St. John’s Church. It was first placed on the back of one of the old cedar choir stalls. When the present stalls were given, the plaque was repositioned by the choir vestry door. The inscription reads:

IN MEMORY OF F. R. UNSWORTH
FOR MANY YEARS
A MEMBER OF THIS CHOIR
DIED 31ST. OCTOBER 1928
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

WALSH, Joan Carr

Joan Walsh was born on 15th October 1918 the daughter of Jack Dean and Frances Jean; formerly Carr. Joan was educated at Broadland House School. She was a keen sportswoman and represented her school playing tennis. She was a member of St. John’s Church choir for many years.

The family home was ‘Pengana’ at 41 West Tamar Road, Launceston. This house was built by George McKinlay,” of McKinlay’s Pty. Ltd. In 1940 Joan married Gordon Alexander Walsh at St. John’s Church.

They had two sons, Michael John and Anthony Gordon.

During World War II Joan was an active worker with the Voluntary Aid Service Detachment. Joan’s father, Jack Dean, was manager of the South British Insurance Co., and was involved in much of the sub-division of the Trevallyn area. Throughout her life Joan was devoted to her family, her home and St. John’s Church. She died on 12th August 1978 and in the church her family erected a stained-glass window in her memory. The subject of the window is ‘The Salutation’ or ‘Elizabeth greeting Mary’, and the inscription reads:

IN MEMORY OF JOAN CARR WALSH 1918-1978
‘MY SOUL DOTH MAGNIFY THE LORD
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

WAR MEMORIALS

Inside nearly all the places of worship in Launceston and surrounding districts, there have been placed honour boards, plaques, windows and other such things to commemorate those members of each congregation who fought and who in the several wars in which our countrymen have taken part.

In most cases there are long lists of names of men and women who joined the services and served overseas in the country’s defence. Those who died overseas have been marked with a cross in most cases. Several have been dealt with elsewhere in the book and are those that appear as individual memorials.

However, there is one war memorial that is worthy of separate mention for its artistic importance. It is a beautiful interpretation of Leonardo da Vinci’s ‘The Last Supper’ in sectile mosaic placed as a reredos in St. John’s Church in 1921.

It is fitted to a curved template that fits snugly to the curved wall of the sanctuary. A plaque was also erected in the church listing the names of the twenty-four men who died. The inscription reads:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN GRATEFUL MEMORY OF THE MEN FROM THIS PARISH WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE GREAT WAR 1914 – 1918.
THE REREDOS IN THIS CHURCH HAS BEEN ERECTED BY THE PARISHIONERS.
BALDERSON C. BALDSTRUP G.H. BECK A.K. COLLINS V. COOKE R. CRAWFORD N. O’DOUGHARTY F.C. EVANS R.F. ECCLES A.E. GOOD F. GATENBY L. HANCOCK P.H. HARRISON R. FRITH A.G. FRITH R. KIDDLE R. DE LITTLE M.G. POWELL G. ROBSON T.K.M. TAYLOR B.L.
PRITCHARD A. TEVELEIN E.L. TOLSON G. WESTBROOK V.G.
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

WATHERN, Annie Florence

Annie was born in Launceston nnie on 20th March 1872 daughter of William Fowler and Emma Wathen. William had come to Launceston in 1845 to take up an appointment as master-in-charge of the day school conducted in St. John’s Schoolroom under the management of the church. William and his young brother, Osborne, were from Wootton Bassett, Gloucestershire, England.

Annie was brought up in a manner befitting a young lady of the Victorian era living in the colonies, skilled in the gentle arts and devoted to her family and the church. She attended St. John’s Church and was confirmed there in June 1892 by the Bishop of Tasmania, the Rt Reverend H. H. Montgomery.’ Annie spent her life engaged in charitable and good works, and assisted with funds for the extension of St. John’s Church.

She died on 21st November 1953 and in her memory a plaque of opus sectile mosaic was erected in St. John’s. The inscription reads:

IN MEMORY OF ANNIE WATHEN
A GENEROUS BENEFACTRESS TO THIS CHURCH
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

WEEDON, Charles James and Charlotte

Charles Weedon was born in London, England, in April 1810. He was the eldest son of James Weedon, also of London. He received an English education, and in 1831 he emigrated to Van Diemen’s Land on the ship ‘Thomas Laurie’, which arrived in Launceston on 18th February 1831 bringing wine, guns, paper, sheep, dried fruits, as well as passengers.

Charles Weedon worked first as managing clerk for the firm of Connelly & Co., in Launceston.

In 1834 he visited Port Phillip with the Henty brothers; this was before Melbourne was established. Then in 1839 he married Charlotte, born 1819, eldest daughter of Charles Browne Hardwicke and Elizabeth, formerly Chapman, both of Norfolk Plains. Charles Hardwicke came to Van Diemen’s Land in 1816.

In 1842, Charles Weedon opened his own business as auctioneer and general merchant, a business that grew to become the largest of its kind in Launceston. In the 1980s there is still a firm operating with the name of C. Weedon & Co.

He also became agent for the Derwent & Tamar Assurance Co. in 1845. One of his sons eventually took over this agency. Charles had many public and private interests. He was one of the original directors of the Launceston & Western Railway, a director of the Bank of Tasmania, a warden of the Marine Board, and a Member of the Legislative Council.

He was a Freemason as a member of the Lodge of Hope. He was also one of the original members of the Municipal Council in 1853. From 1850 to 1872 he was a trustee of the Launceston Church Grammar School.

Charles resided at many places in the colony, Treswick, Northcote and finally Norfolk Plains where he settled for many years as a pastoralist and horse-breeder. He established one of the first turf clubs in the North and bred some of the best thoroughbreds’in the colony. When their large family grew up, Charles and Charlotte moved to settle at Piper’s River; and in 1873 they moved once more to reside in Canning Street, Launceston.

Charles and Charlotte were regular attenders at St. John’s Church where he was a churchwarden in 1845 and 1846.

Charles died in Launceston in 1874, and Charlotte died 26th September 1901. A font to replace an earlier one was given to St. John’s Church in memory of the Weedons. The inscription on the base of it reads:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD PRESENTED BY MRS. W. MARTIN IN MEMORY OF
HER FATHER AND MOTHER
CHARLES JAMES AND CHARLOTTE WEEDON
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

WELLS, Algernon Lucadou

Algernon was born in 1857, the son of Arthur and Elizabeth Wells of Lyttleton Street. Arthur was a well-known merchant in the community and connected to the family of dentists living on the North West Coast.

After a good education Algernon entered the employ of the Launceston Gas Co. as an accountant and worked there for over thirty years.

His first wife was Sarah Jane Cogger, eldest daughter of John Cogger of Horsmonden, not far from Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England. Sarah died on 30th October 1908.

Algernon married again on 17th August 1911. His new bride was Eleanor Isabel Bartley, eldest daughter of Charles Booth and Margaret Alicia Bartley of Abbott Street.

As well as being employed at the Gas Co., Algernon was for many years choirmaster at St. Paul’s Church, only resigning in 1906 to take up a similar appointment at St. John’s Church for the next six years. There he worked in conjunction with the organist, Miss Mabel Evershed, daughter of Alfred Edward and Sarah Evershed.

On 21st August 1913 Algernon was overcome by a heart attack and died that day, aged 55 years. In his memory a brass plaque was placed by the choir vestry door in St. John’s. The inscription reads:

IN LOVING MEMORY OF ALGERNON LUCADOU WELLS
LATE CHOIRMASTER OF THIS CHURCH.
DIED AUGUST 21ST 1913
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

WESTBROOK, Elizabeth Susan

Elizabeth was born in 1856, the eldest daughter of Walter Henry Westbrook, partner in the firm of Messrs Bell & Westbrook, auctioneers of Charles Street.

This family is descended from the Westbrooks who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land in 1820 and settled at Macquarie Plains.

Elizabeth was given an adequate education and was an accomplished singer. She and her brothers and sister attended St. John’s Sunday School and later Elizabeth joined the church choir and was a faithful member for over forty years.

In February 1920, Emily Westbrook, sister of Elizabeth died aged 61. On 28th October the same year Francis, Elizabeth’s brother died aged 63, and on the same day Elizabeth herself died aged 64. In her memory a brass plaque was placed in the choir stalls of St. John’s Church. In more recent years it has been repositioned by the choir vestry door. The inscription reads:

AN AFFECTIONATE REMEMBRANCE OF ELIZABETH SUSAN WESTBROOK
42 YEARS A FAITHFUL MEMBER OF THIS CHOIR FELL ASLEEP 28TH OCTOBER 1920
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

WHITE, Merle Ann

Merle was born on 22nd October, 191*, only daughter of three children of Harry and Annie Hawkey of Beaconsfield. Harry arrived in Tasmania from Cornwall in 1888 aged 6 years, and eventually worked in the gold mine in Beaconsfield. Merle was educated at the Beaconsfield School and later the Charles Street State School in Launceston. She undertook a commercial course at Miss Darcey’s establishment and her first employment was with R. L. Mayhead, shipping agents, in Charles Street, in a secretarial capacity; she later worked at Mrs Woods’ hairdressing salon.

In March 1939 she married Thomas Peter White of Launceston. They had a family of three children. All attended St. John’s Church where Merle was very involved with the women’s groups, particularly the Women’s Guild.

She died on 22nd December 1982 and in her memory the members of the Guild donated a beautiful blackwood flower pedestal. The inscription on it reads:

IN MEMORY OF MERLE ANN WHITE
D.22-12-82 LOVED BY ALL
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

WHITFELD, Ernest

Ernest was born at Southport, Van Diemen’s Land, in 1844, the son of Frederick Francis Whitfeld, who was government medical officer of the settlement at Southport. Frederick came from Kent, England, in 1842.

The family moved to Richmond then to Longford where Ernest received his early education at Miss Murray’s school. He also attended Christ’s College at Bishopsbourne and Mr R. N. Habart’s school at Longford. At the age of 19 he travelled to New Zealand where he gained much farming knowledge. He returned ten years later to settle in the North East.

He came to Launceston in 1880 and took up some mining interests. He was appointed acting police magistrate and acting commissioner of the Court of Requests in 1886; and in 1894 became police magistrate and commissioner of the Court of Requests at Launceston and Lilydale. By 1903 he had retired from both these positions.

On 29th March 1884 he married Lavinia Dunning of Launceston. They had two children.

He was extremely interested in the tourist industry and was a very active chairman of the Tourist Association, being well aware of what the island had to offer to visitors. Likewise, he was very effective as chairman of the City and Suburban Improvement Association. He was made a life member of the Mechanics’ Institute in recognition of his work on its behalf as president and in other offices. He gave several lectures on the history of Launceston and its people, collaborating with a George Fuller who had lived in Launceston during the 1830s and 40s.

Ernest Whitfeld was made a member of the Licensing Board and a special judge at the International Exhibition in Launceston in 1892. He was elected to the chair of the Public Works Commission in 1904, and when the Royal Commission on Education was appointed in 1907, he was made a member.

He took an interest in every aspect of Launceston’s growth, in its culture and its youth. He was involved with the Literary and Musical Competitions and was a trustee of the Launceston Church Grammar School.

For many years he was a lay-reader of St. John’s Church, treasurer and churchwarden there and was a member of the Building Fund Committee formed in the 1890s for the. 1901-1911 extensions at the church. He gave a great deal of his life to charitable works. Another great interest was history. He wrote extensively on the State’s church history, including articles on the pioneer clergymen of Tasmania and contributed considerably to the 1900 edition of the “Cyclopaedia of Tasmania”.

He died on 26th April 1923. At St. John’s Church a marble plaque was erected in the chapel in his memory and also the St. John Street iron gates on the property boundary were given. The plaque is inscribed as follows:

TO THE MEMORY OF
ERNEST WHITFELD
WHO DIED 26 APRIL 1923
HONOURED FOR HIS SERVICES
AND PARTICULARLY IN CONNECTION WITH THE ERECTION OF THIS CHURCH BUILDING
WARDEN, LAY-READER, HISTORIAN
And on the iron gates:
IN MEMORY OF ERNEST WHITFELD ESQ.
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

WILKINSON, Christopher George

Christopher Wilkinson was born in England on 16th December 1855. He was educated there and graduated M.A. from St. John’s College, Cambridge.

He was made a deacon of the Church of England at Ripon in 1880, and priest in 1881. His first appointment was as curate at Calverley, 1880-1881, then at U pholland, 1882-1889.

He came to Tasmania the next year and became the incumbent of Emu Bay, moving round the parishes of Wynyard and Burnie.

In 1895 he accepted the position of co-headmaster of the Launceston Church Grammar School with Mr Harry Gillett. The Reverend Wilkinson remained headmaster until 1918. At this time the school was situated at 37 Elizabeth Street, next to St. John’s Church. Mrs Wilkinson, Florence, had been a much loved school matron. In conjunction with his duties at the school, the Reverend Wilkinson was assistant curate of St. John’s. He was appointed acting rector in 1919, between the departure of Canon Baker and the arrival of the Reverend Crotty.

The Wilkinsons had two sons and four daughters, one of the latter, Doris, became headmistress of the Launceston Girls’ Grammar School, in Elizabeth Street.

For a time after retirement, the Reverend and Mrs Wilkinson lived with Doris at her school, then the three of them went to where Doris was appointed headmistress, to Darlinghurst Church of England Girls’ Grammar School, but in 1926, the Reverend and Mrs Wilkinson moved to Cremorne, Sydney.

He died there on 4th May 1929 and she died on 16th August 1937. At the Launceston Church Grammar School one of the school houses was named in honour of the priest and former headmaster. The school has in its possession a silver chalice, once his property; it now bears the inscription:

CHRISTOPHER G. WILKINSON, HIS CHALICE,
L.C.G.S. HEADMASTER 1895-1918
to this chalice a silver paten has been added with the inscription:
MOS PATRIUS ET DISCIPLINA
IN LOVING MEMORY OF CHRISTOPHER GEORGE WILKINSON PRIEST,
AND OF FLORENCE HIS WIFE 1895-1918
In recognition of his work at St. John’s Church, a marble plaque was erected in the chapel, bearing the following inscription:
MOS PATRIUS ET DISCIPLINA
CHRISTOPHER GEORGE WILKINSON
Late in 1929, at Holy Trinity Church, Launceston, in recognition of his worthy contribution to the spiritual well-being of so many people in and around Launceston, the chapel furniture was given to his memory. The inscription on the altar reads:
TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN MEMORY OF
CHRISTOPHER GEORGE WILKINSON PRIEST
THIS ALTAR TOGETHER WITH
OTHER FURNISHINGS IN THIS CHAPEL,
WAS ERECTED BY HIS FELLOW COMMUNICANTS AND DEDICATED ON OCT. 20TH 1929
BY THE LORD BISHOP OF TASMANIA
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

WING, Marie Lillian

Marie was born in Albany, W.A, the eldest daughter of Clarence and Marie Murgatroyd who arrived in Australia from the UK in the 1920s.

The family moved to Tasmania when Marie was three years old and lived in West Launceston where Marie attended the West Launceston Primary School. She sang in the school choir and also excelled academically and at most sports. Following her High School years Marie graduated as a teacher from the Launceston Teachers College and set off on a life-long career of teaching.

Marie attended St. John’s Sunday School and was involved in many aspects of church life, including Bible reading and was recognised by the Royal School of Church Music for her 60+ years as a member of the choir.

Marie married Trevor Wing at St. John’s and they enjoyed over 54 years of married life.

After her death in 2009, a plaque was placed on the south choir stalls which reads:

In loving memory of
Marie Lillian Wing
1934-2009
A member of this choir for many years
To the glory of God

WILLIAMS, Willis John

Willis J. Williams was born at Essendon, Victoria, in 1879. He was the son of Henry Plane Williams and Emma, formerly Hibbard. He received his education at Melbourne Grammar School. For a time Willis was employed at the Mount Gambier Freezing Works and became manager there. He conducted some of the first experiments in freezing fresh vegetables while there. During World War I he was employed as supervisor of the loading of foodstuffs for supply ships and transport vessels; for this work he was awarded the M.B.E. after the war.

From August 1934 to January 1950 he was college treasurer at Moore Theological College, Sydney, N.S.W., and during that time he was a lay-reader and lay-canon of St. Andrew’s Cathedral, Sydney.

Willis was also a lay-reader in Tasmania, vice-president of the British & Foreign Bible Society for about eighteen years and honorary treasurer of the Commonwealth Council of the British & Foreign Bible Society for a number of years.

His other great interest was in the Masonic movement, and was a keen member and a Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of New South Wales and Tasmania.

He had two brothers and one sister. He married twice and had children by the first marriage. In Launceston he lived at 53 Talbot Road and attended St. John’s Church.

Willis died in Launceston on 26th September 1956 aged 77.

A brass memorial plaque has been erected in St. John’s Church; the inscription reads:

WILLIS JOHN WILLIAMS M.B.E.
FORMER LAY-CANON OF
ST. ANDREWS CATHEDRAL SYDNEY, LAY-READER FOR SYDNEY AND TASMANIA, 15 YEARS HON. TREASURER MOORE THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE, SYDNEY, VICE PRESIDENT OF THE B.F.B.S.,
&  18 YEARS HON. TREASURER OF COMMONWEALTH COUNCIL,
PAST DEPUTY GRAND MASTER OF GRAND LODGES OF N.S.W. & TAS. 1879
A GRATEFUL CHRISTIAN 1956
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

YOUL, John

John Youl was born at Epsom, Surrey, England, in 1777. He received an English education, and when he was 23 he was sent with a group of men by the London Missionary Society to Tahiti.

The mission was not a great success. Some of the members lost their lives and all but two were expelled from Tahiti. John Youl was one of those expelled. He failed to gain weight in the fattening pens, and was rejected as a tasty meal by the cannibals. He gained his freedom, and no doubt that of his friends, by being able to shave thirty of the tribesmen with his cut-throat razor without spilling one drop of blood.

The missionaries made their escape and by 1807 John Youl was at Port Jackson and there he met with a group of Non-Conformists, who had formed a settlement at Portland Head, on the Hawkesbury River in New South Wales. In 1808 this group formed the ‘Portland Head Society for the Promoting of Christian Knowledge and the Education of Youth’.

In 1809 this Society built on Ebenezer Mount a small building to be used as a church and school. It still bears the name ‘Ebenezer Church’ and is claimed by the Presbyterians as the oldest one in Australia. John Youl became its first minister and school teacher.

In 1809 John Youl married Jane Loder, daughter of ‘Sergeant’ George Loder, local gaoler and pound keeper. Youl worked in New South Wales for six years and then returned to England where he was ordained deacon by the Bishop of Chester on 15th March 1815 and in June the same year he was ordained priest by the Bishop of London. He returned to New South Wales with an appointment as chaplain at Port Dalrymple, Van Diemen’s Land.

The Reverend Youl was detained in Sydney until he could take up his appointment at Port Dalrymple in 1819. He arrived there in November and settled at George Town, making regular seasonal visits up the Tamar to Launceston.

In 1824 the main settlement was moved from George Town to Launceston and the Reverend Youl became a resident of Launceston. The building in the settlement first used for worship was a converted blacksmith’s shop. It also served as a school and court-house.

In September1824 the foundations were begun for a church, and on 28th December, 1824, the corner stone was laid with great ceremony. The land, set in the bush away from the river and the houses, had been consecrated the previous year, 1823, by the Reverend Samuel Marsden of Sydney, the senior chaplain of the two colonies.

On the memorable day of Friday, 16th December 1825 the Reverend John Youl first opened the new St. John’s Church for divine service. It was in a very unfinished state. The galleries were not fitted and the tower was incomplete. Youl opened a public subscription to purchase an organ. He took an interest in the labours of a prisoner at the Launceston Goal who was making a cast-iron clock for the church. This was to be the first town clock.

Unfortunately the Reverend Youl did not keep diaries of his life’s work for the church, but the registers of the parish dating from his first visit in 1819, show the magnitude of his work. His parish extended to all the settled areas in the north of the island, and included duties at the church, the gaol and the factories where the female prisoners were, the schools and the condemned cell.

The Reverend Youl did not live to see his church completed as on 26th March 1827 he died as a result of hard work and ill-health. He was buried in what became the Cypress Street Burying Ground.

John and Jane Youl had nine children. The Government had given the Reverend Youl 200 acres of valuable land beyond the Norfolk Plains area, and after her husband’s death, Jane moved onto their property called ‘Symmons Plains’ with her family. The Reverend Youl’s glass chalice was taken to Symmons Plains and only returned to St John’s Church in 1973 when a young descendant of John Youl, The Reverend David Lewis, was appointed the church as assistant curate. Jane Youl died on 19th July 1877. Direct descendants of Jane and the Reverend John Youl held the property at ‘Symmons Plains’ until 2012 when the property was sold.

When the old burying Ground was closed in the late 1950s, the Youl family claimed the headstone of John Youl. Since the sale of the property family members had the headstone mended and mounted on a stand and gave it to St John’s where it stands, honoured, in the north ambulatory.

In the church a brass plaque was erected in memory of John Youl, pioneer clergyman. The inscription reads:

IN MEMORY OF REVEREND JOHN YOUL,
ASSISTANT CHAPLAIN TO
THE SETTLEMENT OF PORT DALRYMPLE
IN VAN DIEMEN’S LAND 1819,
OFFICIATING MINISTER AT GEORGE TOWN TILL 1824.
HE THEN MOVED TO LAUNCESTON AND ON DECEMBER 16TH. 1825, OFFICIATED AT THE OPENING CEREMONY OF THIS CHURCH,
IN WHICH HE MINISTERED TILL THE DAY OF HIS DEATH MARCH 26TH. 1827 AGED 50 YEARS
(Extract from Engraved in Memory by J.S.Gill. 1988)

A further small plaque in the north choir stalls acknowledges a donation towards the restoration of the pipe organ, and in memory of John Youl, by Revd. David Lewis, a former curate of St. John’s, and a great-great-grandson of the Reverend John Youl.